The Self-Regulating Processing Theory and an Exploration of the Subjective Experiences of Individuals with COPD

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163427
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Self-Regulating Processing Theory and an Exploration of the Subjective Experiences of Individuals with COPD
Author(s):
Findeisen, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Findeisen, PhD, RN, RRT, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Nursing, Methuen, Massachusetts, USA, email: Mary_Findeisen@uml.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Little is known about the subjective experiences of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) over time, including decisions surrounding the treatment regimen. The purpose of this research was to: 1) understand COPD from the perspective of the individual with the disease including the perceptions, meanings and experiences influencing illness behavior prior to and after diagnosis, 2) determine if and how closely characteristics of the self-regulating processing theory of illness representation were evident in the participants' descriptions of COPD over time. Background: Health care professionals generally assume that once a treatment regimen has been prescribed it will be followed. Yet it is not uncommon, particularly in chronic illnesses for individuals to ignore or abandon prescribed treatment regimens. According to the Self-Regulating Processing Theory from health psychology (Leventhal, Nerenz & Steele, 1984) it is an individual's perception and interpretation of an illness or health threat that provides the basis for illness behavior including decisions surrounding the prescribed treatment regimen. Approach: Three Caucasian adults, two women (age 69 and 78) and one man (age 84) diagnosed with COPD and living in Northern New England participated in a series of audio-taped interviews in their homes and maintained a health diary of symptoms and responses. Major Points & Rationale: The participants' experiences aligned closely with the major assumption and relational statements of the self-regulating processing theory. Four factors identified in the theory (cause, duration, consequence and identity) influenced the perception and interpretation of symptoms and resulting behaviors. The consequence factor was expressed in terms of functional ability. Conclusions: The theory was useful in exploring the perception and interpretation of symptoms of COPD and resulting behavioral responses. A diagnosis of COPD and treatment recommendations from the health care professional had little impact on decisions to follow treatment recommendations. Instead symptoms and the effect on functional ability influenced behavioral responses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Self-Regulating Processing Theory and an Exploration of the Subjective Experiences of Individuals with COPDen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFindeisen, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Findeisen, PhD, RN, RRT, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Nursing, Methuen, Massachusetts, USA, email: Mary_Findeisen@uml.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163427-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Little is known about the subjective experiences of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) over time, including decisions surrounding the treatment regimen. The purpose of this research was to: 1) understand COPD from the perspective of the individual with the disease including the perceptions, meanings and experiences influencing illness behavior prior to and after diagnosis, 2) determine if and how closely characteristics of the self-regulating processing theory of illness representation were evident in the participants' descriptions of COPD over time. Background: Health care professionals generally assume that once a treatment regimen has been prescribed it will be followed. Yet it is not uncommon, particularly in chronic illnesses for individuals to ignore or abandon prescribed treatment regimens. According to the Self-Regulating Processing Theory from health psychology (Leventhal, Nerenz & Steele, 1984) it is an individual's perception and interpretation of an illness or health threat that provides the basis for illness behavior including decisions surrounding the prescribed treatment regimen. Approach: Three Caucasian adults, two women (age 69 and 78) and one man (age 84) diagnosed with COPD and living in Northern New England participated in a series of audio-taped interviews in their homes and maintained a health diary of symptoms and responses. Major Points & Rationale: The participants' experiences aligned closely with the major assumption and relational statements of the self-regulating processing theory. Four factors identified in the theory (cause, duration, consequence and identity) influenced the perception and interpretation of symptoms and resulting behaviors. The consequence factor was expressed in terms of functional ability. Conclusions: The theory was useful in exploring the perception and interpretation of symptoms of COPD and resulting behavioral responses. A diagnosis of COPD and treatment recommendations from the health care professional had little impact on decisions to follow treatment recommendations. Instead symptoms and the effect on functional ability influenced behavioral responses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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