2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163429
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Proxy Decision Making in Mental Retardation (MR): Ethical Considerations
Author(s):
Fisher, Kathleen M.; Orkin, Fredrick K.; Green, Michael
Author Details:
Kathleen M. Fisher, PhD, CRNP, Associate Professor, Drexel University College of Nursing & Health Professions, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kmf43@drexel.edu; Fredrick K. Orkin, MD, MBA, MSc; Michael Green, MD, MS
Abstract:
Purpose: This interdisciplinary study impacts an overlooked and vulnerable population. The need to understand proxy decision making will increasingly be required with the aging of the MR population. Theoretical Framework: Bioethical issues pertaining to MR proxy decision making often center on contentious health care issues including: sterilizations, abortions or the cessation of life-saving treatments. Decisions surrounding routine and less extraordinary treatments are not well articulated. Thus, while decision-making models present a foundation for understanding the topic, it lacks practical application to the subject matter being addressed. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): All state licensed facilities (i.e. 262 agencies) were surveyed using Dillman's Tailored Design Method. Six nurses with a minimum of 5 years' MR experience reviewed the survey for face validity. Response options to discern ethical concerns (e.g. respect for autonomy, beneficence, or justice), include: "rely on your best judgment", "decide as a team with others", "do as the medical expert suggests", "go along with the family wishes", "follow state regulations and policies", and "have knowledge of individual wishes". Individual factors such as: level of functional ability, general level of health, behavior including agitation/depression, individual's age, family involvement, quality of life, spiritual beliefs, prognosis, costs to the agency (beyond any health insurance coverage), individual's ability to cooperate, risk of the procedure, and potential health status benefit, are included. Proxies are asked to comment on the emotional burden of the decision-making process, the confidence they have in their decision, and circumstances under which the individual with MR is included in the process. Appropriate descriptive statistical analysis using SPSS will be completed while the bioethicist team member guides the analysis of the ethical aspects of the data. Results: Ongoing research. Conclusions and Implications: Findings and applications for other proxy decision makers, including caretakers of the physically disabled, the elderly, the chronically mentally ill, and other vulnerable populations are expected.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProxy Decision Making in Mental Retardation (MR): Ethical Considerationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Kathleen M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOrkin, Fredrick K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Michaelen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen M. Fisher, PhD, CRNP, Associate Professor, Drexel University College of Nursing & Health Professions, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kmf43@drexel.edu; Fredrick K. Orkin, MD, MBA, MSc; Michael Green, MD, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163429-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This interdisciplinary study impacts an overlooked and vulnerable population. The need to understand proxy decision making will increasingly be required with the aging of the MR population. Theoretical Framework: Bioethical issues pertaining to MR proxy decision making often center on contentious health care issues including: sterilizations, abortions or the cessation of life-saving treatments. Decisions surrounding routine and less extraordinary treatments are not well articulated. Thus, while decision-making models present a foundation for understanding the topic, it lacks practical application to the subject matter being addressed. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): All state licensed facilities (i.e. 262 agencies) were surveyed using Dillman's Tailored Design Method. Six nurses with a minimum of 5 years' MR experience reviewed the survey for face validity. Response options to discern ethical concerns (e.g. respect for autonomy, beneficence, or justice), include: "rely on your best judgment", "decide as a team with others", "do as the medical expert suggests", "go along with the family wishes", "follow state regulations and policies", and "have knowledge of individual wishes". Individual factors such as: level of functional ability, general level of health, behavior including agitation/depression, individual's age, family involvement, quality of life, spiritual beliefs, prognosis, costs to the agency (beyond any health insurance coverage), individual's ability to cooperate, risk of the procedure, and potential health status benefit, are included. Proxies are asked to comment on the emotional burden of the decision-making process, the confidence they have in their decision, and circumstances under which the individual with MR is included in the process. Appropriate descriptive statistical analysis using SPSS will be completed while the bioethicist team member guides the analysis of the ethical aspects of the data. Results: Ongoing research. Conclusions and Implications: Findings and applications for other proxy decision makers, including caretakers of the physically disabled, the elderly, the chronically mentally ill, and other vulnerable populations are expected.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:26Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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