Development of an Instrument to Measure Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress: The Symptom Experience Index (SEI)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163431
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of an Instrument to Measure Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress: The Symptom Experience Index (SEI)
Author(s):
Fu, Mei R.; McDaniel, Roxanne; Rhodes, Verna
Author Details:
Mei R. Fu, PhD, RN, CNS, Assistant Professor, New York University College of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: mf67@nyu.edu; Roxanne McDaniel, PhD, RN; Verna Rhodes, EdS, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Symptom assessment and management are vital aspects of patient care through the entire illness trajectory of diagnosis, treatment, recovery, and palliation. Symptom occurrence and distress are essential components of symptom experience and major outcome variables for symptom management. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the Symptom Experience Index (SEI), an adaptation of the Adapted Symptom Distress Scale. The SEI measures symptom experience and symptom occurrence and symptom distress. Theoretical Framework: The development of SEI was based on a nursing practice model for symptom management derived from the self-regulation theory and an integrative conceptual analysis of symptom assessment and management. The model emphasizes the difference between the occurrence of a symptom (or multiple symptoms) and the distress (emotional response) to symptom occurrence. It is the distress from symptom occurrence promotes a person to take actions and use known coping mechanisms to alleviate the distress. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A contrasted-group and test-retest approach was employed to determine construct validity and reliability of the SEI. The SEI is a 41-item Likert scale, assessing 20 symptoms that can be categorized into respiratory, gastrointestinal, fatigue, sleeping, cognitive, neurological, elimination (urinary and bowel), pain/comfort, and appearance. The SEI was administered to a convenience sample of 158 participants, including rehabilitation, obstetrical, cancer patients, and well adults in a midwestern state. Results: Construct validity was supported by significant difference among the groups. The SEI demonstrated strong internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.91, for symptom experience, 0.85 for symptom occurrence, and 0.84 for symptom distress. Spearman correlation demonstrated high test-retest reliability (r=0.98 p=0.0001) demonstrating the stability of the SEI. Conclusions and Implications: The SEI is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used as baseline and outcome measure for healthcare providers to assess the impact of multiple symptoms on patients and effectiveness of interventions to manage symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of an Instrument to Measure Symptom Occurrence and Symptom Distress: The Symptom Experience Index (SEI)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFu, Mei R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDaniel, Roxanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, Vernaen_US
dc.author.detailsMei R. Fu, PhD, RN, CNS, Assistant Professor, New York University College of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: mf67@nyu.edu; Roxanne McDaniel, PhD, RN; Verna Rhodes, EdS, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163431-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Symptom assessment and management are vital aspects of patient care through the entire illness trajectory of diagnosis, treatment, recovery, and palliation. Symptom occurrence and distress are essential components of symptom experience and major outcome variables for symptom management. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the Symptom Experience Index (SEI), an adaptation of the Adapted Symptom Distress Scale. The SEI measures symptom experience and symptom occurrence and symptom distress. Theoretical Framework: The development of SEI was based on a nursing practice model for symptom management derived from the self-regulation theory and an integrative conceptual analysis of symptom assessment and management. The model emphasizes the difference between the occurrence of a symptom (or multiple symptoms) and the distress (emotional response) to symptom occurrence. It is the distress from symptom occurrence promotes a person to take actions and use known coping mechanisms to alleviate the distress. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A contrasted-group and test-retest approach was employed to determine construct validity and reliability of the SEI. The SEI is a 41-item Likert scale, assessing 20 symptoms that can be categorized into respiratory, gastrointestinal, fatigue, sleeping, cognitive, neurological, elimination (urinary and bowel), pain/comfort, and appearance. The SEI was administered to a convenience sample of 158 participants, including rehabilitation, obstetrical, cancer patients, and well adults in a midwestern state. Results: Construct validity was supported by significant difference among the groups. The SEI demonstrated strong internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.91, for symptom experience, 0.85 for symptom occurrence, and 0.84 for symptom distress. Spearman correlation demonstrated high test-retest reliability (r=0.98 p=0.0001) demonstrating the stability of the SEI. Conclusions and Implications: The SEI is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used as baseline and outcome measure for healthcare providers to assess the impact of multiple symptoms on patients and effectiveness of interventions to manage symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:28Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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