2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163433
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Stress in Childbearing Women
Author(s):
Gennaro, Susan; Douglas, Steven D.
Author Details:
Susan Gennaro, DSN, RN, FAAN, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gennaro@nursing.upenn.edu; Steven D. Douglas, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: Stress is correlated with poor pregnancy outcomes but little is known about how best to measure stress in clinical and research settings, especially in vulnerable populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of four different measurements of stress (Corticotrophin Releasing Hormone, CRH; Prenatal Distress Questionnaire, PDQ; Perceived Stress Scale, PSS; and Generic Stress Question, GSQ) in African American women (who are at increased risk for delivering prematurely). Measures were selected based on clinical feasibility and prior research. Theoretical Framework: The framework of this study was physiologic. Perceived stress increases the release of CRH which in turn increases other stress hormones resulting in prostaglandin release and possible preterm labor and delivery. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Sixty African American women, pregnant between 24-34 weeks of gestation and receiving care at a large hospital in the Northeast agreed to participate. Every four weeks until delivery, during regularly scheduled prenatal visits, participants completed all questionnaires and blood samples were obtained. CRH was analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Correlations between the measures of stress and the reliability of the questionnaires were evaluated. Results: The validity of the PSS and PDQ is supported by the high correlations between these measures. (r = 0.55 to 0.72; p = 0.001 to < 0.0001). CRH was not correlated with either the PSS or PDQ. Both the PSS and PDQ were reliable measures of stress (0.85 to 0.92). The GSQ was not related to any of the other measures of stress. Conclusions and Implications: The generic measure of stress, GSQ, most easily used in clinical practice, was not a valid measure of stress. Although both the PSS and PDQ were valid and reliable and are feasible tools to use in clinical practice, further work needs to be done in order to compare physiologic and pencil and paper measures of stress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Stress in Childbearing Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGennaro, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Steven D.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Gennaro, DSN, RN, FAAN, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gennaro@nursing.upenn.edu; Steven D. Douglas, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163433-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Stress is correlated with poor pregnancy outcomes but little is known about how best to measure stress in clinical and research settings, especially in vulnerable populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of four different measurements of stress (Corticotrophin Releasing Hormone, CRH; Prenatal Distress Questionnaire, PDQ; Perceived Stress Scale, PSS; and Generic Stress Question, GSQ) in African American women (who are at increased risk for delivering prematurely). Measures were selected based on clinical feasibility and prior research. Theoretical Framework: The framework of this study was physiologic. Perceived stress increases the release of CRH which in turn increases other stress hormones resulting in prostaglandin release and possible preterm labor and delivery. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Sixty African American women, pregnant between 24-34 weeks of gestation and receiving care at a large hospital in the Northeast agreed to participate. Every four weeks until delivery, during regularly scheduled prenatal visits, participants completed all questionnaires and blood samples were obtained. CRH was analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Correlations between the measures of stress and the reliability of the questionnaires were evaluated. Results: The validity of the PSS and PDQ is supported by the high correlations between these measures. (r = 0.55 to 0.72; p = 0.001 to < 0.0001). CRH was not correlated with either the PSS or PDQ. Both the PSS and PDQ were reliable measures of stress (0.85 to 0.92). The GSQ was not related to any of the other measures of stress. Conclusions and Implications: The generic measure of stress, GSQ, most easily used in clinical practice, was not a valid measure of stress. Although both the PSS and PDQ were valid and reliable and are feasible tools to use in clinical practice, further work needs to be done in order to compare physiologic and pencil and paper measures of stress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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