2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163434
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Domestic Violence Education and Support Program
Author(s):
Glazer, Greer; Draucker, Claire; Zeller, Richard
Author Details:
Greer Glazer, RN, CNP, PhD, Dean & Professor, University of Massachusetts Boston, College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: greer.glazer@umb.edu; Claire Draucker, RN, CNS, PhD; Richard Zeller, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a Domestic Violence Education and Support Program on the screening and diagnosis of domestic violence. The components of the 2-year program included an interdisciplinary steering committee, yearly continuing education and support programs (plus optional sessions to discuss personal experiences) and a program website. Theoretical Framework: The Conceptual Model of Nursing & Health Policy (Fawcett and Russell, 2001) was used. This level one model evaluated nursing and healthcare practice process effectiveness. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): All nurses (N=69), social workers (N=2) and 23% of (N=6) physicians at an OB/GYN department of a medical center in northeast Ohio attended a 6 hour continuing education session and 66% (N=52) attended a half-day maintenance CE one year later. All individuals completed the Adaptation of Domestic Violence Education and Support Survey (Family Violence Prevention Fund) prior to the CE, immediately after the CE and 6, 12, and 18 months after. The 35 Point Assessment of Your Institutional Response (Family Violence Prevention Fund) was completed prior to the program and 6, 12, and 18 months after. Chart review was done prior to the program and 1 year after implementation. A 5 wave research design with repeated measures ANOVA was used. Results: There were significant differences in practitioner knowledge, attitude, confidence, and practice behaviors. Chart review revealed significant differences in screening, women diagnosed with current domestic violence prenatally or intrapartally and women diagnosed with past domestic violence intrapartally one year post intervention. There were significant differences in the institutions response to domestic violence from 5/35 to 30/35 eighteen months post-intervention. Conclusions and Implications: The unique program features contributed to its success. Findings lend support for past research on successful institutionalization that includes mainstreaming, normalization, accommodation of institutional culture, leadership involvement, respect for practitioner attitudes/skills, building local capacity, establishing accountability for actions, and providing outside technical support.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a Domestic Violence Education and Support Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGlazer, Greeren_US
dc.contributor.authorDraucker, Claireen_US
dc.contributor.authorZeller, Richarden_US
dc.author.detailsGreer Glazer, RN, CNP, PhD, Dean & Professor, University of Massachusetts Boston, College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: greer.glazer@umb.edu; Claire Draucker, RN, CNS, PhD; Richard Zeller, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163434-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a Domestic Violence Education and Support Program on the screening and diagnosis of domestic violence. The components of the 2-year program included an interdisciplinary steering committee, yearly continuing education and support programs (plus optional sessions to discuss personal experiences) and a program website. Theoretical Framework: The Conceptual Model of Nursing & Health Policy (Fawcett and Russell, 2001) was used. This level one model evaluated nursing and healthcare practice process effectiveness. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): All nurses (N=69), social workers (N=2) and 23% of (N=6) physicians at an OB/GYN department of a medical center in northeast Ohio attended a 6 hour continuing education session and 66% (N=52) attended a half-day maintenance CE one year later. All individuals completed the Adaptation of Domestic Violence Education and Support Survey (Family Violence Prevention Fund) prior to the CE, immediately after the CE and 6, 12, and 18 months after. The 35 Point Assessment of Your Institutional Response (Family Violence Prevention Fund) was completed prior to the program and 6, 12, and 18 months after. Chart review was done prior to the program and 1 year after implementation. A 5 wave research design with repeated measures ANOVA was used. Results: There were significant differences in practitioner knowledge, attitude, confidence, and practice behaviors. Chart review revealed significant differences in screening, women diagnosed with current domestic violence prenatally or intrapartally and women diagnosed with past domestic violence intrapartally one year post intervention. There were significant differences in the institutions response to domestic violence from 5/35 to 30/35 eighteen months post-intervention. Conclusions and Implications: The unique program features contributed to its success. Findings lend support for past research on successful institutionalization that includes mainstreaming, normalization, accommodation of institutional culture, leadership involvement, respect for practitioner attitudes/skills, building local capacity, establishing accountability for actions, and providing outside technical support.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:31Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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