Moving Beyond the "What" to the "Why " : Use of the Post-Fall Index as an Improved Solution for Fall Documentation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163435
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moving Beyond the "What" to the "Why " : Use of the Post-Fall Index as an Improved Solution for Fall Documentation
Author(s):
Gray-Miceli, Deanna; Strumpf, Neville E.; Johnson, Jerry C.; Kinosian, Bruce; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Maddox, Jessica; Conlin, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Deanna Gray-Miceli, DNSc, APRN, FAANP, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: deannagm@nursing.upenn.edu; Neville E. Strumpf, PhD., FAAN; Jerry C. Johnson, MD; Bruce Kinosian, MD; Sarah Ratcliffe, PhD; Jessica Maddox, MSN; Elizabeth Conlin, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Incident reports (IR) used post-fall gather skeletal descriptions of "what happened". In response to a lack of empiric post-fall tools, a 30-item Post-Fall Index (PFI) was developed. The objective here was to further delineate fall event descriptions on IRs according to classifications of fall causes detailed in the PFI. Theoretical Framework: Medical Model and Root Cause Analysis. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Secondary analysis of 269 fall IRs from assisted living (AL) and skilled nursing (SN) units of a continuing care retirement community using the Post-Fall Index (PFI) as a template. A trained gerontological nurse practitioner abstracted fall descriptions into one of 6 fall categories from the PFI. A second RN rater independently reviewed 10% for clinical congruency. Results: Of 130 IRs in AL, most were unwittnessed (90%; n=117) with non-fracture injuries (30%; n= 39). Using the PFI template, sixty-three percent ( n=82 ) of fall events were attributed to either environmental (30%; n=39) causes, acute medical problems (8%; n=10), poor safety awareness (9%; n=12), chronic disease symptoms (11%; n=14) or equipment malfunction (5%; n=7). Of 169 IRs in SN, most were unwittnessed (85%; n=140) with non-fracture injuries (30%; n=50). Using the PFI template fifty-nine percent (n=99) were attributed to environmental causes (18%; n=31), acute medical problems (8%; n=14), poor safety awareness (12%; n=21), chronic diseases symptoms (13%; n=22) or equipment malfunction (6%; n=10). Percent agreement by raters is reported. Conclusions and Implications: Secondary analysis using the PFI revealed 60% of unwitnessed falls had discernable symptoms and circumstantial information potentially helpful in deciphering fall etiologies. Through a more comprehensive post-fall assessment, by use of the PFI, possible etiologies can be further assessed, and plans of care directed toward individual needs of the falling person.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoving Beyond the "What" to the "Why " : Use of the Post-Fall Index as an Improved Solution for Fall Documentationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGray-Miceli, Deannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStrumpf, Neville E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Jerry C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKinosian, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.authorRatcliffe, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaddox, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.authorConlin, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsDeanna Gray-Miceli, DNSc, APRN, FAANP, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: deannagm@nursing.upenn.edu; Neville E. Strumpf, PhD., FAAN; Jerry C. Johnson, MD; Bruce Kinosian, MD; Sarah Ratcliffe, PhD; Jessica Maddox, MSN; Elizabeth Conlin, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163435-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Incident reports (IR) used post-fall gather skeletal descriptions of "what happened". In response to a lack of empiric post-fall tools, a 30-item Post-Fall Index (PFI) was developed. The objective here was to further delineate fall event descriptions on IRs according to classifications of fall causes detailed in the PFI. Theoretical Framework: Medical Model and Root Cause Analysis. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Secondary analysis of 269 fall IRs from assisted living (AL) and skilled nursing (SN) units of a continuing care retirement community using the Post-Fall Index (PFI) as a template. A trained gerontological nurse practitioner abstracted fall descriptions into one of 6 fall categories from the PFI. A second RN rater independently reviewed 10% for clinical congruency. Results: Of 130 IRs in AL, most were unwittnessed (90%; n=117) with non-fracture injuries (30%; n= 39). Using the PFI template, sixty-three percent ( n=82 ) of fall events were attributed to either environmental (30%; n=39) causes, acute medical problems (8%; n=10), poor safety awareness (9%; n=12), chronic disease symptoms (11%; n=14) or equipment malfunction (5%; n=7). Of 169 IRs in SN, most were unwittnessed (85%; n=140) with non-fracture injuries (30%; n=50). Using the PFI template fifty-nine percent (n=99) were attributed to environmental causes (18%; n=31), acute medical problems (8%; n=14), poor safety awareness (12%; n=21), chronic diseases symptoms (13%; n=22) or equipment malfunction (6%; n=10). Percent agreement by raters is reported. Conclusions and Implications: Secondary analysis using the PFI revealed 60% of unwitnessed falls had discernable symptoms and circumstantial information potentially helpful in deciphering fall etiologies. Through a more comprehensive post-fall assessment, by use of the PFI, possible etiologies can be further assessed, and plans of care directed toward individual needs of the falling person.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:32Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.