Competing logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for HBOC

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163437
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Competing logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for HBOC
Author(s):
Hamilton, Rebekah J.
Author Details:
Rebekah J. Hamilton, PhD RN, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh Health Promotion and Development, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hamilr@pitt.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore how individuals who receive genetic test results for the BRCA mutations try to incorporate complex genetic information into their experience of being at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Background: Individuals at increased risk for HBOC often are acutely aware of their family's history with cancer. Genetic testing has made it possible for individuals to know if they too may be part of the family cancer legacy. Anthropologists argue that the new genetics has changed the concept of kinship. I will argue that the family experience with cancer sets up a competing logic with the genetics information provided by health care professionals. This competing logic impacts how risk is understood and what information is used to make medical decisions. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Grounded theory was used to explore the experience of predictive genetic testing. Nineteen individuals, recruited via the Internet were interviewed by either phone or email. Results: Blending family history and genetic facts was one of the major categories developed during axial coding. For most participants the science of genetics was simply one of several factors that informed their perception of risk and their subsequent decisions. Conclusions and Implications: While others have suggested that the new genetics changes the idea of kinship, this study presents data supporting the idea that kinship and family context change how genetic facts are understood and the meaning they take on. It appears that family history trumps genetic facts when the two are competing logics in understanding risk for inherited breast cancer/ovarian cancer. Clinically, the importance is that the actions taken after receiving a positive BRCA1/2 mutation test appear to be associated with how individuals mold the genetic facts based on the family context. Understanding these competing logics may assist health care providers in counseling individuals at risk for HBOC.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCompeting logics of Family Experience and Genetic Facts: Impact on Perceived Risk and Decision Making in Women at Risk for HBOCen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Rebekah J.en_US
dc.author.detailsRebekah J. Hamilton, PhD RN, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh Health Promotion and Development, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: hamilr@pitt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163437-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore how individuals who receive genetic test results for the BRCA mutations try to incorporate complex genetic information into their experience of being at increased risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). Background: Individuals at increased risk for HBOC often are acutely aware of their family's history with cancer. Genetic testing has made it possible for individuals to know if they too may be part of the family cancer legacy. Anthropologists argue that the new genetics has changed the concept of kinship. I will argue that the family experience with cancer sets up a competing logic with the genetics information provided by health care professionals. This competing logic impacts how risk is understood and what information is used to make medical decisions. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Grounded theory was used to explore the experience of predictive genetic testing. Nineteen individuals, recruited via the Internet were interviewed by either phone or email. Results: Blending family history and genetic facts was one of the major categories developed during axial coding. For most participants the science of genetics was simply one of several factors that informed their perception of risk and their subsequent decisions. Conclusions and Implications: While others have suggested that the new genetics changes the idea of kinship, this study presents data supporting the idea that kinship and family context change how genetic facts are understood and the meaning they take on. It appears that family history trumps genetic facts when the two are competing logics in understanding risk for inherited breast cancer/ovarian cancer. Clinically, the importance is that the actions taken after receiving a positive BRCA1/2 mutation test appear to be associated with how individuals mold the genetic facts based on the family context. Understanding these competing logics may assist health care providers in counseling individuals at risk for HBOC.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:34Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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