Efficacy of Oral Sucrose Analgesia During Routine Immunizations at 2 and 4 Months of Age

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163438
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Oral Sucrose Analgesia During Routine Immunizations at 2 and 4 Months of Age
Author(s):
Hatfield, Linda A.; Gusic, Maryellen E.; Dyer, Anne Marie; Polomano, Rosemary C.
Author Details:
Linda A. Hatfield, PhD(c), MS, CNNP, Pediatric Research Specialist, Penn State University Department of Nursing, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: lhatfield@psu.edu; Maryellen E. Gusic, MD; Anne Marie Dyer, MS; Rosemary C. Polomano, PhD, RN, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and duration of oral sucrose as a pre-procedural intervention for acute pain during routine immunizations at 2 and 4 months of age. Theoretical Framework: Melzack and Wall (1965) gate control theory of pain. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A prospective, parent and investigator masked, randomized, clinical trial sampled eighty-three healthy, term infants receiving routine 2- or 4-month immunizations at an academic medical center's ambulatory pediatric clinic. Infants were randomly stratified into a 2- or 4-month study group then randomized to receive 24% oral sucrose (0.6ml/kg) or a sterile water control solution, (0.6ml/kg). The intervention was administered 2 minutes before the combined DTaP, IPV, and Hep B vaccine. The University of Wisconsin Children's Hospital pain scale measured infant behavioral pain response for the treatment and control group at baseline, and 2, 5, 7, and 9 minutes following solution administration. A 2 by 2 repeated measures ANOVA examined the effects of treatment conditions and age on pain assessment scores. Results: The treatment group (sucrose, n=38) and control group (sterile water, n=44) displayed increasing behavioral pain responses from baseline at 2, 5, and 7 minutes. Compared to the control group, the treatment group had significantly lower behavioral pain response at 2 minutes (p< 0.0001); 5 minutes (p< 0.0001); 7 minutes (p< 0.0078) and 9 minutes (p< 0.0001). Between 7 and 9 minutes, the treatment group's behavioral pain response decreased significantly more than the control group's (p< 0.003). Behavioral pain response exceeded a moderate amount at 2 minutes in the control group and at 5 minutes in the treatment group. Conclusions and Implications: Sucrose is an effective pre-procedure intervention for injection pain at 2 and 4 months of age. Immunizations constitute a necessary, frequent preventive health measure in pediatric clinics. The development of a practical clinical intervention for pain management during immunizations offers an alternative approach to promote comfort and alleviate pain and distress in healthy newborns.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Oral Sucrose Analgesia During Routine Immunizations at 2 and 4 Months of Ageen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHatfield, Linda A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGusic, Maryellen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDyer, Anne Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPolomano, Rosemary C.en_US
dc.author.detailsLinda A. Hatfield, PhD(c), MS, CNNP, Pediatric Research Specialist, Penn State University Department of Nursing, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: lhatfield@psu.edu; Maryellen E. Gusic, MD; Anne Marie Dyer, MS; Rosemary C. Polomano, PhD, RN, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163438-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Evaluate the efficacy and duration of oral sucrose as a pre-procedural intervention for acute pain during routine immunizations at 2 and 4 months of age. Theoretical Framework: Melzack and Wall (1965) gate control theory of pain. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A prospective, parent and investigator masked, randomized, clinical trial sampled eighty-three healthy, term infants receiving routine 2- or 4-month immunizations at an academic medical center's ambulatory pediatric clinic. Infants were randomly stratified into a 2- or 4-month study group then randomized to receive 24% oral sucrose (0.6ml/kg) or a sterile water control solution, (0.6ml/kg). The intervention was administered 2 minutes before the combined DTaP, IPV, and Hep B vaccine. The University of Wisconsin Children's Hospital pain scale measured infant behavioral pain response for the treatment and control group at baseline, and 2, 5, 7, and 9 minutes following solution administration. A 2 by 2 repeated measures ANOVA examined the effects of treatment conditions and age on pain assessment scores. Results: The treatment group (sucrose, n=38) and control group (sterile water, n=44) displayed increasing behavioral pain responses from baseline at 2, 5, and 7 minutes. Compared to the control group, the treatment group had significantly lower behavioral pain response at 2 minutes (p< 0.0001); 5 minutes (p< 0.0001); 7 minutes (p< 0.0078) and 9 minutes (p< 0.0001). Between 7 and 9 minutes, the treatment group's behavioral pain response decreased significantly more than the control group's (p< 0.003). Behavioral pain response exceeded a moderate amount at 2 minutes in the control group and at 5 minutes in the treatment group. Conclusions and Implications: Sucrose is an effective pre-procedure intervention for injection pain at 2 and 4 months of age. Immunizations constitute a necessary, frequent preventive health measure in pediatric clinics. The development of a practical clinical intervention for pain management during immunizations offers an alternative approach to promote comfort and alleviate pain and distress in healthy newborns.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:35Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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