2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163440
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symbols of Menarche Identified by African-American Girls
Author(s):
Hawthorne-Burdine, Dorothy J.
Author Details:
Dorothy J. Hawthorne-Burdine, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh Health Promotion & Development Department, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dhb6@pitt.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To learn how 9- and 10-year-old girls view the meaning of their first menstrual flow (menarche) and how mothers view the meaning of menarche when it appears in their 9- and 10-year-old daughters. Background: Menarche is commonly identified by such symbols as vaginal blood flow and changes in sexuality and fertility. Symbols hold varied meanings for diverse groups of individuals of different ages. Africa-American girls are now experiencing menarche as early as 9 and 10 years of age, and younger aged girls tend to identify menarche concretely with passing blood, instead of abstractly with sexuality and fertility. An understanding of menarcheal symbols and their meanings, however, has been limited to nonAfrican-American females who were several months and years beyond the time of its occurrence. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The qualitative case study design was used with 30 African-American participants, which included 15 mothers and their 9- or 10-year-old daughter. An audiotaped semi-structure interview took place with a mother-daughter dyad in their homes within 2 to 5 days after completion of menarche. A 5-step, cross-case comparison analysis of the interview data was used to identify major symbolic themes. Results: The four major themes include: (a) Vaginal bleeding, (b) sexual maturation, (c) premenarcheal sexual activity, and (d) sexual payback to biological fathers. With the exception of the latter, all themes were supported in earlier studies of nonAfrican-American girls. Conclusions and Implications: Findings suggest further knowledge is needed about the influence of parents and menarche on the sexual behaviors of early sexually maturing African-American girls so that age-related sexual health interventions can be empirically examined and recommended for implementation as sexual-health strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymbols of Menarche Identified by African-American Girlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHawthorne-Burdine, Dorothy J.en_US
dc.author.detailsDorothy J. Hawthorne-Burdine, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh Health Promotion & Development Department, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dhb6@pitt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163440-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To learn how 9- and 10-year-old girls view the meaning of their first menstrual flow (menarche) and how mothers view the meaning of menarche when it appears in their 9- and 10-year-old daughters. Background: Menarche is commonly identified by such symbols as vaginal blood flow and changes in sexuality and fertility. Symbols hold varied meanings for diverse groups of individuals of different ages. Africa-American girls are now experiencing menarche as early as 9 and 10 years of age, and younger aged girls tend to identify menarche concretely with passing blood, instead of abstractly with sexuality and fertility. An understanding of menarcheal symbols and their meanings, however, has been limited to nonAfrican-American females who were several months and years beyond the time of its occurrence. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The qualitative case study design was used with 30 African-American participants, which included 15 mothers and their 9- or 10-year-old daughter. An audiotaped semi-structure interview took place with a mother-daughter dyad in their homes within 2 to 5 days after completion of menarche. A 5-step, cross-case comparison analysis of the interview data was used to identify major symbolic themes. Results: The four major themes include: (a) Vaginal bleeding, (b) sexual maturation, (c) premenarcheal sexual activity, and (d) sexual payback to biological fathers. With the exception of the latter, all themes were supported in earlier studies of nonAfrican-American girls. Conclusions and Implications: Findings suggest further knowledge is needed about the influence of parents and menarche on the sexual behaviors of early sexually maturing African-American girls so that age-related sexual health interventions can be empirically examined and recommended for implementation as sexual-health strategies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:38Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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