2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163445
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges for Participant Recruitment: Lessons from the CARE Project
Author(s):
Horowitz, June Andrews; Pulcini, Joyce; Gregory, Katherine E.; Hurley, Ann C.; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Cousins, Ann
Author Details:
June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Professor, Boston College School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: horowitz@bc.edu; Joyce Pulcini, PhD, APRN, FAAN; Katherine E. Gregory, RN, PhD (c); Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc; Lynda Tyer-Viola, RNC, PhD; Ann Cousins, RN, PhD (c)
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose is to describe challenges in recruiting women for postpartum depression (PPD) screening for the CARE (Communicating and Relating Effectively) study. Theoretical Framework: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework informs this study. The pathway begins with identifying a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to symptom screening, diagnostic confirmation, and group assignment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Nurses request permission to contact women who delivered at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital for PPD screening. CARE team nurses contact willing women at 4-weeks postpartum for screening. Eligible women are invited to have a home-visit to obtain informed consent and a diagnostic interview. Results: To date, recruitment has produced 815 permission slips. Of 528 women screened, 66 (12.5%) women had positive screens: 9 were too late to enter the protocol, 18 declined participation, and 37 agreed to a follow-up home-visit. From these 37, 22 signed consents, 11 did not schedule or cancelled the home visit, and 4 were ineligible based on pre-diagnostic interview. Of the 22 women who consented, 2 did not meet diagnostic criteria for PPD and 5 women were lost for study follow-up. Thus, 15 women have become active participants. Eligible mothers declined participation in the study for the following reasons: no time, no interest, returning to work, moving, and inability to schedule an appointment. Conclusions and Implications: Recruiting involves funneling from a large population to screening and subsequent diagnostic confirmation. Demands in the postpartum clinical settings, increasing presence of caller-ID, high mobility, early return to work, and scheduling difficulties pose recruitment challenges. Strategies include: linking recruitment to postpartum care requirements to teach about PPD, initiating screening calls from a university telephone to reduce incidence of blocked calls, adjusting scripts for screeners, and offering flexible home-visit schedules. Lessons from this study may inform other clinical trials.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges for Participant Recruitment: Lessons from the CARE Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, June Andrewsen_US
dc.contributor.authorPulcini, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Katherine E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTyer-Viola, Lyndaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCousins, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsJune Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Professor, Boston College School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: horowitz@bc.edu; Joyce Pulcini, PhD, APRN, FAAN; Katherine E. Gregory, RN, PhD (c); Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc; Lynda Tyer-Viola, RNC, PhD; Ann Cousins, RN, PhD (c)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163445-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose is to describe challenges in recruiting women for postpartum depression (PPD) screening for the CARE (Communicating and Relating Effectively) study. Theoretical Framework: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality framework informs this study. The pathway begins with identifying a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to symptom screening, diagnostic confirmation, and group assignment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Nurses request permission to contact women who delivered at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital for PPD screening. CARE team nurses contact willing women at 4-weeks postpartum for screening. Eligible women are invited to have a home-visit to obtain informed consent and a diagnostic interview. Results: To date, recruitment has produced 815 permission slips. Of 528 women screened, 66 (12.5%) women had positive screens: 9 were too late to enter the protocol, 18 declined participation, and 37 agreed to a follow-up home-visit. From these 37, 22 signed consents, 11 did not schedule or cancelled the home visit, and 4 were ineligible based on pre-diagnostic interview. Of the 22 women who consented, 2 did not meet diagnostic criteria for PPD and 5 women were lost for study follow-up. Thus, 15 women have become active participants. Eligible mothers declined participation in the study for the following reasons: no time, no interest, returning to work, moving, and inability to schedule an appointment. Conclusions and Implications: Recruiting involves funneling from a large population to screening and subsequent diagnostic confirmation. Demands in the postpartum clinical settings, increasing presence of caller-ID, high mobility, early return to work, and scheduling difficulties pose recruitment challenges. Strategies include: linking recruitment to postpartum care requirements to teach about PPD, initiating screening calls from a university telephone to reduce incidence of blocked calls, adjusting scripts for screeners, and offering flexible home-visit schedules. Lessons from this study may inform other clinical trials.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:42Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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