2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163446
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Based Postpartum Depression Screening
Author(s):
Horowitz, June Andrews
Author Details:
June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, FAAN, Professor, Boston College School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: horowitz@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Approximately 500,000 women in the United States each year experience PPD, and about half of these women are not evaluated or treated appropriately. Although screening measures can detect PPD symptoms, screening is not yet standard practice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to conduct community-based PPD screening with potential for translation to practice. Theoretical Framework: This study follows AHRQ's pathway for PPD evaluation that begins with identification of a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to symptom screening. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Women who delivered at two hospitals in eastern Massachusetts and granted permission to be contacted for PPD screening, and completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 2-4 weeks postpartum comprised the sample. Research nurses encouraged and assisted women who scored in the moderate to high PPD symptom range, or who endorsed any level of suicidal ideation to contact their Primary Care Providers for follow-up. Results: Of the 1,071 women screened for PPD with the EPDS, 210 women had elevated PPD symptom scores. PPD point prevalence was 19.7%. Correlations between EPDS scores and demographic variables of baby's age, mother's age, mother's education, and parity revealed no meaningful relationships. To compare EPDS scores across ethnic/racial groups, one-way ANOVA was computed. Latina women had the highest mean EPDS score (M=8.08). Although the overall model was significant, Dunnett's posthoc test indicated that between group differences were not significant statistically. Conclusions and Implications: PPD screening measures effectively identify women with elevated depression symptoms who need follow-up mental health evaluation. Evidence from this research, along with outcomes from other studies, begs the question: Is it not time to make cost-effective strategies for PPD screening universal practice? Postpartum women and their families deserve nothing less.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Based Postpartum Depression Screeningen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, June Andrewsen_US
dc.author.detailsJune Andrews Horowitz, PhD, FAAN, Professor, Boston College School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: horowitz@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163446-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Approximately 500,000 women in the United States each year experience PPD, and about half of these women are not evaluated or treated appropriately. Although screening measures can detect PPD symptoms, screening is not yet standard practice. Thus, the purpose of this study was to conduct community-based PPD screening with potential for translation to practice. Theoretical Framework: This study follows AHRQ's pathway for PPD evaluation that begins with identification of a cohort of postpartum women with unknown mood state and moves to symptom screening. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Women who delivered at two hospitals in eastern Massachusetts and granted permission to be contacted for PPD screening, and completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 2-4 weeks postpartum comprised the sample. Research nurses encouraged and assisted women who scored in the moderate to high PPD symptom range, or who endorsed any level of suicidal ideation to contact their Primary Care Providers for follow-up. Results: Of the 1,071 women screened for PPD with the EPDS, 210 women had elevated PPD symptom scores. PPD point prevalence was 19.7%. Correlations between EPDS scores and demographic variables of baby's age, mother's age, mother's education, and parity revealed no meaningful relationships. To compare EPDS scores across ethnic/racial groups, one-way ANOVA was computed. Latina women had the highest mean EPDS score (M=8.08). Although the overall model was significant, Dunnett's posthoc test indicated that between group differences were not significant statistically. Conclusions and Implications: PPD screening measures effectively identify women with elevated depression symptoms who need follow-up mental health evaluation. Evidence from this research, along with outcomes from other studies, begs the question: Is it not time to make cost-effective strategies for PPD screening universal practice? Postpartum women and their families deserve nothing less.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:44Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.