2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163447
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring the Oral Health of Nursing Home Elders
Author(s):
Jablonski, Rita A.; Munro, Cindy; Grap, Mary Jo; Elswick Jr., Ronald K.; Ligon, Mary B.; Swecker, Tammy K.
Author Details:
Rita A. Jablonski, PhD, RN, ANP, Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University, Adult Health, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: rajablon@vcu.edu; Cindy Munro, PhD, RN, ANP; Mary Jo Grap, PhD, RN, ANP; Ronald K. Elswick Jr., PhD; Mary B. Ligon, BS, MS; Tammy K. Swecker, BSDH
Abstract:
Purpose: To test the feasibility of obtaining data measuring the oral health of nursing home residents. Theoretical Framework: There is emerging clinical evidence linking oral health to acute infections and exacerbations of chronic illnesses. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This was a descriptive pilot study. Eligibility criteria included female gender and dentate or daily denture wearer. Thirty-nine (39) nursing home residents were recruited: 20 elders from one facility and 19 elders from another facility. Data were incomplete for 1 subject; analyses were conducted using data from the remaining 38 subjects. Eighty-seven percent of the subjects were white; 13% were African-American. The average age of the subjects was 81 years. Fifty-eight percent were diagnosed with dementia. Subjects were recruited from 2 nursing homes that differed by size, geographic locale, and proprietary status. Plaque on both dentures and teeth were measured using the University of Mississippi Oral Hygiene Index. The number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF) were recorded and summed to obtain the DMF score. Functional and cognitive status were measured using subscales of the Functional Assessment Checklist. Dementia was quantified using the Global Deterioration Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests for group differences. Results: The average DMF score was 17.4 (SD, 8.70). Dentate subjects had an average plaque index of 9.2 (maximum score, 10). African-American elders were more likely to have worse dental plaque scores than white residents (t=3.08, DF=26, p=0.0049), despite no statistical differences in cognitive status, dependence on others for care, age, and duration in the nursing home. Conclusions and Implications: Oral health can be safely and efficiently quantified in the nursing home population. The high plaque and DMF scores support the need for additional research to test methods that will improve the mouth and dental care of elders residing in nursing homes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring the Oral Health of Nursing Home Eldersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJablonski, Rita A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMunro, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrap, Mary Joen_US
dc.contributor.authorElswick Jr., Ronald K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLigon, Mary B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSwecker, Tammy K.en_US
dc.author.detailsRita A. Jablonski, PhD, RN, ANP, Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University, Adult Health, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: rajablon@vcu.edu; Cindy Munro, PhD, RN, ANP; Mary Jo Grap, PhD, RN, ANP; Ronald K. Elswick Jr., PhD; Mary B. Ligon, BS, MS; Tammy K. Swecker, BSDHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163447-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To test the feasibility of obtaining data measuring the oral health of nursing home residents. Theoretical Framework: There is emerging clinical evidence linking oral health to acute infections and exacerbations of chronic illnesses. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This was a descriptive pilot study. Eligibility criteria included female gender and dentate or daily denture wearer. Thirty-nine (39) nursing home residents were recruited: 20 elders from one facility and 19 elders from another facility. Data were incomplete for 1 subject; analyses were conducted using data from the remaining 38 subjects. Eighty-seven percent of the subjects were white; 13% were African-American. The average age of the subjects was 81 years. Fifty-eight percent were diagnosed with dementia. Subjects were recruited from 2 nursing homes that differed by size, geographic locale, and proprietary status. Plaque on both dentures and teeth were measured using the University of Mississippi Oral Hygiene Index. The number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF) were recorded and summed to obtain the DMF score. Functional and cognitive status were measured using subscales of the Functional Assessment Checklist. Dementia was quantified using the Global Deterioration Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t-tests for group differences. Results: The average DMF score was 17.4 (SD, 8.70). Dentate subjects had an average plaque index of 9.2 (maximum score, 10). African-American elders were more likely to have worse dental plaque scores than white residents (t=3.08, DF=26, p=0.0049), despite no statistical differences in cognitive status, dependence on others for care, age, and duration in the nursing home. Conclusions and Implications: Oral health can be safely and efficiently quantified in the nursing home population. The high plaque and DMF scores support the need for additional research to test methods that will improve the mouth and dental care of elders residing in nursing homes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:45Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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