2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163448
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Crisis Simulation
Author(s):
Jakouskas, Tara S.; Murray, W. Bosseau
Author Details:
Tara S. Jankouskas, MSN, RN, C, Clinical Nurse Educator, Penn State University, Nursing, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: tjankouskas@psu.edu; W. Bosseau Murray, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: Despite technical expertise of health care providers, errors and inefficiencies in patient management occur. Frequently, these errors and inefficiencies are related to poor collaboration impacting effective communication, delegation, and leadership of the health care team. This study will evaluate collaboration outcomes of a multidisciplinary pediatric team by teaching crisis resource management skills. Patient crisis scenarios will be taught using a human patient simulator (HPS). Theoretical Framework: Self-efficacy theory by Bandura provides a framework for this simulation learning investigation. Concepts of vicarious learning and mastery experience are operationalized and will be used to assess outcomes associated with successful performance. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A quasi-experimental pre/post test design will be used with a convenience sample of pediatric nurses, pediatric residents, and anesthesia residents from Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Multidisciplinary groups of 3 pediatric nurses, 2 pediatric residents and one anesthesia resident will take part in eight simulation sessions scheduled from August 2005 to December 2005. Each group works through a video-taped scenario on the HPS. Next, crisis resource management skills are reviewed followed by debriefing. Then the group repeats a different but equally challenging video-taped scenario on the HPS. Following each scenario, the principal investigator measures collaboration skills using a participant survey tool and an observational rating scale. Descriptive statistics and paired t-test will be used to analyze changes in collaboration subsequent to the crisis resource management program. Results: Results will be determined at study completion, scheduled for December 2005. Conclusions and Implications: Self-efficacy theory predicts that skill improvement results from using mastery experience and vicarious learning principles. An expected outcome of this study is that the curriculum using the HPS will positively influence collaboration skills of participants. It is anticipated that participants' increased self-efficacy will lead to future success in applying these skills in actual patient care environments.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Crisis Simulationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJakouskas, Tara S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, W. Bosseauen_US
dc.author.detailsTara S. Jankouskas, MSN, RN, C, Clinical Nurse Educator, Penn State University, Nursing, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: tjankouskas@psu.edu; W. Bosseau Murray, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163448-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Despite technical expertise of health care providers, errors and inefficiencies in patient management occur. Frequently, these errors and inefficiencies are related to poor collaboration impacting effective communication, delegation, and leadership of the health care team. This study will evaluate collaboration outcomes of a multidisciplinary pediatric team by teaching crisis resource management skills. Patient crisis scenarios will be taught using a human patient simulator (HPS). Theoretical Framework: Self-efficacy theory by Bandura provides a framework for this simulation learning investigation. Concepts of vicarious learning and mastery experience are operationalized and will be used to assess outcomes associated with successful performance. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A quasi-experimental pre/post test design will be used with a convenience sample of pediatric nurses, pediatric residents, and anesthesia residents from Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Multidisciplinary groups of 3 pediatric nurses, 2 pediatric residents and one anesthesia resident will take part in eight simulation sessions scheduled from August 2005 to December 2005. Each group works through a video-taped scenario on the HPS. Next, crisis resource management skills are reviewed followed by debriefing. Then the group repeats a different but equally challenging video-taped scenario on the HPS. Following each scenario, the principal investigator measures collaboration skills using a participant survey tool and an observational rating scale. Descriptive statistics and paired t-test will be used to analyze changes in collaboration subsequent to the crisis resource management program. Results: Results will be determined at study completion, scheduled for December 2005. Conclusions and Implications: Self-efficacy theory predicts that skill improvement results from using mastery experience and vicarious learning principles. An expected outcome of this study is that the curriculum using the HPS will positively influence collaboration skills of participants. It is anticipated that participants' increased self-efficacy will lead to future success in applying these skills in actual patient care environments.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:46Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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