Physiologic Markers and Subjective Symptoms Predicting Onset of Labor in Healthy Gravidas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163449
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiologic Markers and Subjective Symptoms Predicting Onset of Labor in Healthy Gravidas
Author(s):
Johnston, Nancy A.
Author Details:
Nancy A. Johnston, PhD, CRNP, Assistant Professor, Cedar Crest College, Nursing, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: najohnst@cedarcrest.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: In 2002, 12 percent of all babies born in the United States were premature, (National Center for Health Statistics, 2005). A key to improved outcomes is early diagnosis of women at risk. Researchers have not identified triggers of labor onset or developed sensitive assessment tools that can predict women at risk for premature labor. This study tested an instrument utilizing healthy pregnant women to predict onset of labor. Theoretical Framework: The physiologic concept of systemic inflammatory response, including sickness symptoms such as headache, fatigue, myalgia, or appetite changes within the context of the midrange Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz et al. 1997) were incorporated in a checklist administered in the last three weeks of pregnancy to explore levels of response until labor onset in healthy gravidas. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Data from interview groups of healthy pregnant women (n=5) and interrater reliability testing ( = .93) by nursing experts (n=9) amended the Body Listening in Late Pregnancy Symptom Checklist (BLLPSC) .Testing began by administering the BLLPSC to healthy pregnant women (n=31) from 37 weeks gestational age until onset of early labor. Concurrent salivary samples using (ELISA) determined levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1-ƒ and stress hormone cortisol. Daily symptom diaries were kept and first morning oral temperature was recorded. Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted. Results: The BLLPSC detected presence of sickness symptoms .Thirty percent of women at entry had achiness, fatigue and felt sick. Correlations between BLLPSC and physiologic markers were not significant (r= -.330; p=.08). Systemic inflammatory response at 3 days prior to labor was statistically significant (t = -4.45; df=33; p=.014) when comparing primigravidas with multigravidas. Conclusions and Implications: The BLLPSC tool and non-invasive, salivary technique provided patient-friendly measures of collecting data. Replication of these methods in a larger sample is indicated to continue to refine the BLLPSC. Prenatal nurses could be alert to sickness symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiologic Markers and Subjective Symptoms Predicting Onset of Labor in Healthy Gravidasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Nancy A.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy A. Johnston, PhD, CRNP, Assistant Professor, Cedar Crest College, Nursing, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: najohnst@cedarcrest.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163449-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: In 2002, 12 percent of all babies born in the United States were premature, (National Center for Health Statistics, 2005). A key to improved outcomes is early diagnosis of women at risk. Researchers have not identified triggers of labor onset or developed sensitive assessment tools that can predict women at risk for premature labor. This study tested an instrument utilizing healthy pregnant women to predict onset of labor. Theoretical Framework: The physiologic concept of systemic inflammatory response, including sickness symptoms such as headache, fatigue, myalgia, or appetite changes within the context of the midrange Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz et al. 1997) were incorporated in a checklist administered in the last three weeks of pregnancy to explore levels of response until labor onset in healthy gravidas. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Data from interview groups of healthy pregnant women (n=5) and interrater reliability testing ( = .93) by nursing experts (n=9) amended the Body Listening in Late Pregnancy Symptom Checklist (BLLPSC) .Testing began by administering the BLLPSC to healthy pregnant women (n=31) from 37 weeks gestational age until onset of early labor. Concurrent salivary samples using (ELISA) determined levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1-ƒ and stress hormone cortisol. Daily symptom diaries were kept and first morning oral temperature was recorded. Descriptive statistical analyses were conducted. Results: The BLLPSC detected presence of sickness symptoms .Thirty percent of women at entry had achiness, fatigue and felt sick. Correlations between BLLPSC and physiologic markers were not significant (r= -.330; p=.08). Systemic inflammatory response at 3 days prior to labor was statistically significant (t = -4.45; df=33; p=.014) when comparing primigravidas with multigravidas. Conclusions and Implications: The BLLPSC tool and non-invasive, salivary technique provided patient-friendly measures of collecting data. Replication of these methods in a larger sample is indicated to continue to refine the BLLPSC. Prenatal nurses could be alert to sickness symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:47Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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