2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163452
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supporting low income breastfeeding women: A community health intervention
Author(s):
Pugh, Linda; Milligan, Renee A.; Frick, Kevin; Spatz, Diane; Bronner, Yvonne L.
Author Details:
Linda Pugh, Associate Professor, John Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: lpugh@son.jhmi.edu; Renee A. Milligan; Kevin Frick; Diane Spatz; Yvonne Bronner
Abstract:
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to: 1) identify the benefits of breastfeeding for mother and infant; 2) discuss the preliminary findings of a community strategy to increase the duration of breastfeeding. Abstract: Breastfeeding improves the health of mothers and babies. Women who breastfeed have less osteoporosis, and cancer. Breastfed infants have less SIDS, ear infections, diarrhea, and respiratory allergies. Healthy People 2000 set a goal "75% of all women begin breastfeeding right after delivery and 50% continue for six months." Numbers of breastfeeding mothers, particularly low-income remain low, as only 50.4% of women on WIC initiate breastfeeding and only 16.5% continue for six months. The primary aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate an intervention to increase the duration of breastfeeding in low-income women during the first six months of their infants' lives. The intervention was carried out by a community health nurse and a peer counselor. The costs of the intervention and the costs of medical care for the child were also tracked. Forty-one minority women (100% on Medical Assistance, mean age 21.6 years, 92% Black,) were randomly assigned to treatment or usual care groups. The treatment group received usual care plus hospital and home visits and telephone support by the BST for six months after delivery. Analysis at 6 months of the intervention revealed 45% of the intervention group (n=9) were still breastfeeding (with 30% exclusively breastfeeding), and only 35% (n=7) in the usual care group were still breastfeeding (with 15% exclusively breastfeeding). Findings suggest that this strategy is a promising intervention that provides a high quality cost effective way to improve the health of babies and women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupporting low income breastfeeding women: A community health interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPugh, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilligan, Renee A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrick, Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpatz, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorBronner, Yvonne L.en_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Pugh, Associate Professor, John Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: lpugh@son.jhmi.edu; Renee A. Milligan; Kevin Frick; Diane Spatz; Yvonne Bronneren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163452-
dc.description.abstractLearning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant will be able to: 1) identify the benefits of breastfeeding for mother and infant; 2) discuss the preliminary findings of a community strategy to increase the duration of breastfeeding. Abstract: Breastfeeding improves the health of mothers and babies. Women who breastfeed have less osteoporosis, and cancer. Breastfed infants have less SIDS, ear infections, diarrhea, and respiratory allergies. Healthy People 2000 set a goal "75% of all women begin breastfeeding right after delivery and 50% continue for six months." Numbers of breastfeeding mothers, particularly low-income remain low, as only 50.4% of women on WIC initiate breastfeeding and only 16.5% continue for six months. The primary aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate an intervention to increase the duration of breastfeeding in low-income women during the first six months of their infants' lives. The intervention was carried out by a community health nurse and a peer counselor. The costs of the intervention and the costs of medical care for the child were also tracked. Forty-one minority women (100% on Medical Assistance, mean age 21.6 years, 92% Black,) were randomly assigned to treatment or usual care groups. The treatment group received usual care plus hospital and home visits and telephone support by the BST for six months after delivery. Analysis at 6 months of the intervention revealed 45% of the intervention group (n=9) were still breastfeeding (with 30% exclusively breastfeeding), and only 35% (n=7) in the usual care group were still breastfeeding (with 15% exclusively breastfeeding). Findings suggest that this strategy is a promising intervention that provides a high quality cost effective way to improve the health of babies and women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:50Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.