2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163454
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Premature infant care: Creating a specialty for the 20th century
Author(s):
Reedy, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Reedy, Penn State University, Oreland, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ear22@psu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify, describe and analyze events, methods, and processes used by nurses, physicians, and others that resulted in the creation of a specialty field in health care focused on the needs of the prematurely born infant. Specific Aims: The major aim of this study was to describe and analyze social, cultural and economic conditions that helped redefine the issue of prematurity, persuaded the citizens of the United States to invest heavily in the future of premature infants, and attracted health care professionals to a new specialty field. Framework: In order to understand the present, it is often necessary to examine the past. In today's health care environment, neonatal intensive care is a highly technological, extremely expensive, and intensely resource dependent part of the overall health care industry. This study examines the earliest years of organized premature infant care in order to trace its development, its impact on families and health care professionals, and the expectations of the general public in the event of premature birth. History can also help guide decision making for the future when the choices and decisions of our predecessors our known and the results analyzed. Methods: Social history research was used to conduct the study. Data are drawn from a variety of sources including archival collections of hospitals in Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia, manuscript collections of several influential physicians, and records of the Century of Progress exhibition in Chicago. Nursing and medical literature of the era support the data. Public involvement is illustrated through pertinent newspaper and magazine articles. Results and Conclusions: Hospital based premature infant care is a product of the twentieth century. Separate, dedicated hospital units for premature infants began to appear in the 1920's. New ideas about children in general, declining birth rates and increased visibility all contributed to increasing interest in these infants among professionals and the public. Attentive nursing care was called essential to the successful operation of premature nurseries and in fact was a major ingredient as medical treatment options were limited. In the 1930s medical innovations such as improved incubator technology and oxygen therapy promised better outcomes and enhanced the reputation of hospital based care. Public health campaigns were launched and provided education, financial assistance and even the first transport systems for infants born far from optimal care. Once identified as worthy of emotional and financial investments, premature infants were afforded attention and resources that not only prolonged their lives, but also changed forever the expected response to their birth. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: Previous studies of the development of premature study are rare and those that are available focus on physicians and incubator technology prior to 1920. This study demonstrates the influence of public involvement in the development of this specialty, the innovations and strategies nurses used to improve care, and societal factors that permitted the construction and utilization of premature nurseries. As nurses, physicians, and parents struggle today with the clinical, technological and ethical issues inherent in this specialty, historical perspective provides an understanding of the past, an appreciation of the present, and possible directions for the future.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePremature infant care: Creating a specialty for the 20th centuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReedy, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Reedy, Penn State University, Oreland, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ear22@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163454-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to identify, describe and analyze events, methods, and processes used by nurses, physicians, and others that resulted in the creation of a specialty field in health care focused on the needs of the prematurely born infant. Specific Aims: The major aim of this study was to describe and analyze social, cultural and economic conditions that helped redefine the issue of prematurity, persuaded the citizens of the United States to invest heavily in the future of premature infants, and attracted health care professionals to a new specialty field. Framework: In order to understand the present, it is often necessary to examine the past. In today's health care environment, neonatal intensive care is a highly technological, extremely expensive, and intensely resource dependent part of the overall health care industry. This study examines the earliest years of organized premature infant care in order to trace its development, its impact on families and health care professionals, and the expectations of the general public in the event of premature birth. History can also help guide decision making for the future when the choices and decisions of our predecessors our known and the results analyzed. Methods: Social history research was used to conduct the study. Data are drawn from a variety of sources including archival collections of hospitals in Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia, manuscript collections of several influential physicians, and records of the Century of Progress exhibition in Chicago. Nursing and medical literature of the era support the data. Public involvement is illustrated through pertinent newspaper and magazine articles. Results and Conclusions: Hospital based premature infant care is a product of the twentieth century. Separate, dedicated hospital units for premature infants began to appear in the 1920's. New ideas about children in general, declining birth rates and increased visibility all contributed to increasing interest in these infants among professionals and the public. Attentive nursing care was called essential to the successful operation of premature nurseries and in fact was a major ingredient as medical treatment options were limited. In the 1930s medical innovations such as improved incubator technology and oxygen therapy promised better outcomes and enhanced the reputation of hospital based care. Public health campaigns were launched and provided education, financial assistance and even the first transport systems for infants born far from optimal care. Once identified as worthy of emotional and financial investments, premature infants were afforded attention and resources that not only prolonged their lives, but also changed forever the expected response to their birth. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development in Nursing: Previous studies of the development of premature study are rare and those that are available focus on physicians and incubator technology prior to 1920. This study demonstrates the influence of public involvement in the development of this specialty, the innovations and strategies nurses used to improve care, and societal factors that permitted the construction and utilization of premature nurseries. As nurses, physicians, and parents struggle today with the clinical, technological and ethical issues inherent in this specialty, historical perspective provides an understanding of the past, an appreciation of the present, and possible directions for the future.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:52Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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