9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163455
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of fatigue in critical care nurses
Author(s):
Ruggiero, Jeanne
Author Details:
Jeanne Ruggiero, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: jruggier@andromeda.rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The study of health care provider fatigue is of crucial importance to the promotion of safe patient care environments (Institute of Medicine, 2000). The daily demands of critical care nursing, including psychosocial stressors and heavy patient workloads, make the nurse particularly vulnerable to fatigue, and subsequently accidents and errors. According to the Fatigue Framework (Piper, Lindsey, & Dodd, 1987), age, sleep, and psychosocial patterns such as depression and anxiety can influence the signs and symptoms of fatigue. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships and shift-related differences among chronic shift worker fatigue, age, sleep quality, anxiety and depression in a representative sample of critical care nurses. Methods: The random, nationwide sample included 142 female registered nurses who were full-time providers (8, 10, or 12 hour shifts) of direct patient care in critical care units (M age = 45 years; SD = 8.31). Of this sample, 67 nurses worked permanent day shifts without night rotation, and 75 worked permanent night shifts. Participants completed the Standard Shift work Index Chronic Fatigue Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory- II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at home as indicators of chronic shift worker fatigue, depression, anxiety, and global sleep quality, respectively. In addition, PSQI sleep efficiency, duration, and disturbance subscores were explored. Results and conclusions: Higher chronic fatigue was inversely related to age (r = -.21; p < .01), and positively related to poorer global sleep quality (r = .49; p < .01), lower sleep efficiency (r = .20; p < .01), more sleep disturbances (r = .47; p < .01), anxiety (r = .46; p < .01), and depression (r = .63; p < .01). Independent t-tests revealed that night nurses experienced significantly more depression (t = -2.60; df = 140; p < .01), poorer sleep efficiency (t = -2.24; df = 123; p < .01), shorter sleep duration (t = -1.94; df = 140; p < .05), and worse sleep quality (t = -2.94; df = 140; p < .01) than day nurses. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that among the variables of age, day or night shift, habitual sleep quality, depression, and anxiety, depression was the strongest predictor of chronic fatigue (b = .45; t = 6.0; p < .001), followed by sleep quality (b = .24; t = 3.11; p < .001). Implications for practice: Occupational health providers and hospital administrators need to be aware of the fact that depression and poor sleep quality are more prevalent in night nurses than day nurses, and that they are predictors of chronic fatigue. More educational programs regarding sleep promotion, and counseling services should be made available to critical care nurses on all shifts. Decreased chronic fatigue is likely to result in improved health and safety for critical care nurses and improved patient care in acute care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of fatigue in critical care nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRuggiero, Jeanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJeanne Ruggiero, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: jruggier@andromeda.rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163455-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The study of health care provider fatigue is of crucial importance to the promotion of safe patient care environments (Institute of Medicine, 2000). The daily demands of critical care nursing, including psychosocial stressors and heavy patient workloads, make the nurse particularly vulnerable to fatigue, and subsequently accidents and errors. According to the Fatigue Framework (Piper, Lindsey, & Dodd, 1987), age, sleep, and psychosocial patterns such as depression and anxiety can influence the signs and symptoms of fatigue. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships and shift-related differences among chronic shift worker fatigue, age, sleep quality, anxiety and depression in a representative sample of critical care nurses. Methods: The random, nationwide sample included 142 female registered nurses who were full-time providers (8, 10, or 12 hour shifts) of direct patient care in critical care units (M age = 45 years; SD = 8.31). Of this sample, 67 nurses worked permanent day shifts without night rotation, and 75 worked permanent night shifts. Participants completed the Standard Shift work Index Chronic Fatigue Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory- II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at home as indicators of chronic shift worker fatigue, depression, anxiety, and global sleep quality, respectively. In addition, PSQI sleep efficiency, duration, and disturbance subscores were explored. Results and conclusions: Higher chronic fatigue was inversely related to age (r = -.21; p < .01), and positively related to poorer global sleep quality (r = .49; p < .01), lower sleep efficiency (r = .20; p < .01), more sleep disturbances (r = .47; p < .01), anxiety (r = .46; p < .01), and depression (r = .63; p < .01). Independent t-tests revealed that night nurses experienced significantly more depression (t = -2.60; df = 140; p < .01), poorer sleep efficiency (t = -2.24; df = 123; p < .01), shorter sleep duration (t = -1.94; df = 140; p < .05), and worse sleep quality (t = -2.94; df = 140; p < .01) than day nurses. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that among the variables of age, day or night shift, habitual sleep quality, depression, and anxiety, depression was the strongest predictor of chronic fatigue (b = .45; t = 6.0; p < .001), followed by sleep quality (b = .24; t = 3.11; p < .001). Implications for practice: Occupational health providers and hospital administrators need to be aware of the fact that depression and poor sleep quality are more prevalent in night nurses than day nurses, and that they are predictors of chronic fatigue. More educational programs regarding sleep promotion, and counseling services should be made available to critical care nurses on all shifts. Decreased chronic fatigue is likely to result in improved health and safety for critical care nurses and improved patient care in acute care settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:53Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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