2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163457
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition to motherhood in teen mothers in high school
Author(s):
Sadler, Lois; Swartz, Martha Kirk; Ryan-Krause, Patricia
Author Details:
Lois Sadler, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: lois.sadler@yale.edu; Martha Kirk Swartz; Patricia Ryan-Krause
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this ongoing study is to explore the transition to motherhood in adolescent mothers attending a large urban high school with an on-site parent support program and a school-based child care center. The first study aim, which is derived from Belsky's (1984) Determinants of Parenthood model, is to examine the relationships among maternal variables including personal resources of the student-mothers, perceived environmental sources of stress and support, and outcome variables, including student mothers' parental competence and child health and developmental outcomes. The second study aim is to describe maternal outcomes (student-mothers' school attendance, grades, patterns of continued enrollment or graduation from high school, and repeat childbearing) in the sample. Preliminary analysis of the first 26 cases will be presented. Sample: A paid convenience sample of 26 urban adolescent mothers and their children were interviewed and surveyed. Twenty mothers had children enrolled at least three months in the high school-based child care center, and 6 mothers had children who were cared for by family members. Methods: Maternal personal resources (Beck Depression Inventory and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale), and environmental variables (Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire and Life Event Questionnaire) were assessed and parental competence was measured by the Maternal Self Report Inventory (MSRI; short form) and the Parenting Daily Hassles Scale (PDHS). Parent-child teaching interactions were measured by the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale (NCAST). Child developmental and health outcomes (Bayley Scales of Infant Development and pediatric health record review) were measured in the children of subjects. Patterns of repeat childbearing, high school graduation and attendance were assessed through interview and school record reviews. Results: For all measures, descriptive and reliability statistics will be calculated. Associations will be tested among independent and dependent variables with binary correlations and then using a multi-variate regression model. This preliminary study will allow for determination of effects and calculation of effect size in variables in the model. Conclusions and Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: It is expected that the findings will indicate that urban adolescent mothers attending high school who are enrolled in an on-site parenting support program, as well as their children enrolled in a child care center at the high school, will benefit from the educational and support services that the specialized programs offer. In the case of a particularly high risk group of urban socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescent parents who may not have access to consistent family support and who are trying to both complete their own education and adolescent developmental tasks, school-based child care centers may be a model that brings together the necessary components for the success of these young families. Nursing professionals play an integral role in the design, implementation and evaluation of these specialized programs as well as participating in the ongoing development and testing of more effective models to serve high-risk parents and children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransition to motherhood in teen mothers in high schoolen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSadler, Loisen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwartz, Martha Kirken_US
dc.contributor.authorRyan-Krause, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsLois Sadler, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: lois.sadler@yale.edu; Martha Kirk Swartz; Patricia Ryan-Krauseen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163457-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this ongoing study is to explore the transition to motherhood in adolescent mothers attending a large urban high school with an on-site parent support program and a school-based child care center. The first study aim, which is derived from Belsky's (1984) Determinants of Parenthood model, is to examine the relationships among maternal variables including personal resources of the student-mothers, perceived environmental sources of stress and support, and outcome variables, including student mothers' parental competence and child health and developmental outcomes. The second study aim is to describe maternal outcomes (student-mothers' school attendance, grades, patterns of continued enrollment or graduation from high school, and repeat childbearing) in the sample. Preliminary analysis of the first 26 cases will be presented. Sample: A paid convenience sample of 26 urban adolescent mothers and their children were interviewed and surveyed. Twenty mothers had children enrolled at least three months in the high school-based child care center, and 6 mothers had children who were cared for by family members. Methods: Maternal personal resources (Beck Depression Inventory and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale), and environmental variables (Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire and Life Event Questionnaire) were assessed and parental competence was measured by the Maternal Self Report Inventory (MSRI; short form) and the Parenting Daily Hassles Scale (PDHS). Parent-child teaching interactions were measured by the Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale (NCAST). Child developmental and health outcomes (Bayley Scales of Infant Development and pediatric health record review) were measured in the children of subjects. Patterns of repeat childbearing, high school graduation and attendance were assessed through interview and school record reviews. Results: For all measures, descriptive and reliability statistics will be calculated. Associations will be tested among independent and dependent variables with binary correlations and then using a multi-variate regression model. This preliminary study will allow for determination of effects and calculation of effect size in variables in the model. Conclusions and Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: It is expected that the findings will indicate that urban adolescent mothers attending high school who are enrolled in an on-site parenting support program, as well as their children enrolled in a child care center at the high school, will benefit from the educational and support services that the specialized programs offer. In the case of a particularly high risk group of urban socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescent parents who may not have access to consistent family support and who are trying to both complete their own education and adolescent developmental tasks, school-based child care centers may be a model that brings together the necessary components for the success of these young families. Nursing professionals play an integral role in the design, implementation and evaluation of these specialized programs as well as participating in the ongoing development and testing of more effective models to serve high-risk parents and children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:55Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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