The relationship among emotional intelligence, self-management and glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163458
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship among emotional intelligence, self-management and glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus
Author(s):
Samar, Annmarie D.
Author Details:
Annmarie D. Samar, PhD, RN, Chair and Professor, Worcester State University, Grafton, Massachusetts, email: asamar@worcester.edu
Abstract:
Background: Diabetes brings with it a regimen that has a major impact on an individual's daily life Results from the Diabetes Complication and Control Trial (DCCT) note that insulin dependent diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease requiring intensive daily management. This ten-year trial provides unarguable evidence of the importance of self-management. The findings of the DCCT have been widely publicized, yet many individuals continue to manage their diabetes very poorly. A significant nursing problem encountered in the care of patients is the "why" behind an individual's application or non-application of self management. Although there has been a great deal of speculation about what influences self-management, the application of the emotional intelligence model provides new insight into this familiar nursing problem. Objective: This dissertation research examined the relationship among emotional intelligence, self-management, and glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes. Framework: Mayer and Salovey's Mental Ability Emotional Intelligence Model served as the guiding theoretical framework for this study. Method: A descriptive correlational study design was employed. A sample of 90 adults with type 1 diabetes was obtained from a hospital affiliated diabetes center and via networking. The Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale was utilized to measure total and four branch scores of emotional intelligence. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities was utilized to measure self-management. Results: Data provided partial support for hypothesis 1, in adults with type 1 diabetes, there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and self-management practices; support for hypothesis 2, in adults with type 1 diabetes, there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and glycemic control in males only; and partial support for hypothesis 3; in adults with type 1 diabetes, there is a significant relationship between self-management practices and glycemic control. Conclusions: This study has added to the knowledge regarding the factors that influence self management behavior. The data generated in this exploratory study are a beginning effort to see the relationship of emotional intelligence, self-management, and glycemic control and provide an impetus to look beyond what has traditionally been examined in the hopes of gaining a better understanding of self-management. Emotional intelligence may be a factor in enriching this understanding.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship among emotional intelligence, self-management and glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSamar, Annmarie D.en_US
dc.author.detailsAnnmarie D. Samar, PhD, RN, Chair and Professor, Worcester State University, Grafton, Massachusetts, email: asamar@worcester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163458-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Diabetes brings with it a regimen that has a major impact on an individual's daily life Results from the Diabetes Complication and Control Trial (DCCT) note that insulin dependent diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease requiring intensive daily management. This ten-year trial provides unarguable evidence of the importance of self-management. The findings of the DCCT have been widely publicized, yet many individuals continue to manage their diabetes very poorly. A significant nursing problem encountered in the care of patients is the "why" behind an individual's application or non-application of self management. Although there has been a great deal of speculation about what influences self-management, the application of the emotional intelligence model provides new insight into this familiar nursing problem. Objective: This dissertation research examined the relationship among emotional intelligence, self-management, and glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes. Framework: Mayer and Salovey's Mental Ability Emotional Intelligence Model served as the guiding theoretical framework for this study. Method: A descriptive correlational study design was employed. A sample of 90 adults with type 1 diabetes was obtained from a hospital affiliated diabetes center and via networking. The Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale was utilized to measure total and four branch scores of emotional intelligence. The Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities was utilized to measure self-management. Results: Data provided partial support for hypothesis 1, in adults with type 1 diabetes, there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and self-management practices; support for hypothesis 2, in adults with type 1 diabetes, there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence and glycemic control in males only; and partial support for hypothesis 3; in adults with type 1 diabetes, there is a significant relationship between self-management practices and glycemic control. Conclusions: This study has added to the knowledge regarding the factors that influence self management behavior. The data generated in this exploratory study are a beginning effort to see the relationship of emotional intelligence, self-management, and glycemic control and provide an impetus to look beyond what has traditionally been examined in the hopes of gaining a better understanding of self-management. Emotional intelligence may be a factor in enriching this understanding.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:56Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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