2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163459
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing application of continuous process improvement
Author(s):
Savino, Barbara; Wesley, Carol
Author Details:
Barbara Savino, Penn State University School of Nursing, Pennsylvania, USA, email: bxs42@psu.edu; Carol Wesley
Abstract:
Continuous process improvement has been recognized as a method to deal with clinical problems identified by nurses versus research, which develops new knowledge. Patients in a postoperative cardio thoracic unit were identified as experiencing a higher rate than average of pneumonia. The mean rate of nosocomial pneumonia experienced by postoperative patients is 5-20 % nationally; the patients in the study experienced a rate of over 24%. The CPI tool was developed by experienced, certified critical care nurses and identified several problem areas such as hand washing, length of time on a ventilator, and postoperative invasive procedures. The review studied 59 patients over a 60-day period. The results revealed overwhelmingly that lack of hand washing continues to be a major issue among health care providers, across all disciplines. Hand washing was identified as the major contributor in over 59 % of the cases studied. The other contributing factors being identified as presence of nasogastric tube, post op time to extubation, invasive procedures, and reintubation. These other contributing factors did not prove to be statistically significant when compared to the hand washing issue. The plan of action developed based on the study was to increase compliance with hand washing protocol and decrease incidence of infection. The plan called for overall education across the disciplines regarding hand washing and the instillation of antibacterial soap dispensers inside each door of the patient room. Ongoing monitoring is recommended to assure increased compliance with protocols and decreased incidence of nosocomial infections in the complex surgical patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing application of continuous process improvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSavino, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorWesley, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Savino, Penn State University School of Nursing, Pennsylvania, USA, email: bxs42@psu.edu; Carol Wesleyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163459-
dc.description.abstractContinuous process improvement has been recognized as a method to deal with clinical problems identified by nurses versus research, which develops new knowledge. Patients in a postoperative cardio thoracic unit were identified as experiencing a higher rate than average of pneumonia. The mean rate of nosocomial pneumonia experienced by postoperative patients is 5-20 % nationally; the patients in the study experienced a rate of over 24%. The CPI tool was developed by experienced, certified critical care nurses and identified several problem areas such as hand washing, length of time on a ventilator, and postoperative invasive procedures. The review studied 59 patients over a 60-day period. The results revealed overwhelmingly that lack of hand washing continues to be a major issue among health care providers, across all disciplines. Hand washing was identified as the major contributor in over 59 % of the cases studied. The other contributing factors being identified as presence of nasogastric tube, post op time to extubation, invasive procedures, and reintubation. These other contributing factors did not prove to be statistically significant when compared to the hand washing issue. The plan of action developed based on the study was to increase compliance with hand washing protocol and decrease incidence of infection. The plan called for overall education across the disciplines regarding hand washing and the instillation of antibacterial soap dispensers inside each door of the patient room. Ongoing monitoring is recommended to assure increased compliance with protocols and decreased incidence of nosocomial infections in the complex surgical patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:57Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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