The process of innovative teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom: A cross-case analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163461
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The process of innovative teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom: A cross-case analysis
Author(s):
Schell, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Schell, Assistant Professor, University of Delaware, Department of Nursing, Wilmington, Delaware, USA, email: kaschell@udel.edu
Abstract:
Societal changes and public expectations call for educational strategies in higher education that stimulate active learning. Pursuit of outcomes such as critical and creative thinking, life-long learning, and teamwork require diverse and innovative teaching methods. Yet, many faculty members in baccalaureate nursing education adhere to the established norms of traditional teaching, presenting material in lecture format. The purposes of this qualitative study were to: (1)describe the process of innovative teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom, and (2)explore factors that facilitate or hinder the use of innovative teaching in the classroom by generic baccalaureate nursing faculty. The innovation diffusion and adoption process as described in Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations (1995) served as the theoretical framework for this study. An instrumental, multiple-case design was implemented (Stake, 1998; Yin, 1994). Four faculty members from three NLN-accredited baccalaureate programs within a 100-mile radius of the researcher's home were the primary participants in this study. These individuals were perceived by their respective chairpersons as using innovative teaching strategies in the nursing classroom. These chairpersons, eight faculty colleagues, and twenty-five of the primary faculty's current students were also included in the study. Data collection methods included nonparticipant classroom observations, semi-structured interviews, and document review. Through analysis of field notes and transcriptions of interview audio recordings, four cases of teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom were described. Using several methods suggested by Miles and Huberman (1995), the researcher began data analysis with individual cases and concluded with cross-case analysis. Innovative teaching was found to include six major categories while there were six categories of facilitators and four categories of barriers to the process. The researcher proposes a preliminary model of the process of innovative teaching. The model is discussed within the context of educational and nursing education literature and is examined within the framework of Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and learning theory. Challenges experienced with the conceptualization of innovative teaching as well as methodological considerations are explained. The researcher discusses implications for nursing education and offers suggestions for future research studies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe process of innovative teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom: A cross-case analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchell, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Schell, Assistant Professor, University of Delaware, Department of Nursing, Wilmington, Delaware, USA, email: kaschell@udel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163461-
dc.description.abstractSocietal changes and public expectations call for educational strategies in higher education that stimulate active learning. Pursuit of outcomes such as critical and creative thinking, life-long learning, and teamwork require diverse and innovative teaching methods. Yet, many faculty members in baccalaureate nursing education adhere to the established norms of traditional teaching, presenting material in lecture format. The purposes of this qualitative study were to: (1)describe the process of innovative teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom, and (2)explore factors that facilitate or hinder the use of innovative teaching in the classroom by generic baccalaureate nursing faculty. The innovation diffusion and adoption process as described in Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations (1995) served as the theoretical framework for this study. An instrumental, multiple-case design was implemented (Stake, 1998; Yin, 1994). Four faculty members from three NLN-accredited baccalaureate programs within a 100-mile radius of the researcher's home were the primary participants in this study. These individuals were perceived by their respective chairpersons as using innovative teaching strategies in the nursing classroom. These chairpersons, eight faculty colleagues, and twenty-five of the primary faculty's current students were also included in the study. Data collection methods included nonparticipant classroom observations, semi-structured interviews, and document review. Through analysis of field notes and transcriptions of interview audio recordings, four cases of teaching in the generic baccalaureate nursing classroom were described. Using several methods suggested by Miles and Huberman (1995), the researcher began data analysis with individual cases and concluded with cross-case analysis. Innovative teaching was found to include six major categories while there were six categories of facilitators and four categories of barriers to the process. The researcher proposes a preliminary model of the process of innovative teaching. The model is discussed within the context of educational and nursing education literature and is examined within the framework of Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and learning theory. Challenges experienced with the conceptualization of innovative teaching as well as methodological considerations are explained. The researcher discusses implications for nursing education and offers suggestions for future research studies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:00Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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