2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163462
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of exercise in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
Author(s):
Schlenk, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Schlenk, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: els100@pitt.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to describe exercise levels, types of exercise, and reasons for missing exercise; and to identify functional status, depression, and social support predictors of exercise among persons with RA controlling for demographics. Research Questions: What are the exercise levels, types of exercise, and reasons for missing exercise in persons with RA? Controlling for demographics, do functional status, depression, and social support predict exercise in persons with RA? Framework: Pender's Health Promotion Model provided the framework for this study. Methods: A correlational descriptive design was used in this secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial designed to improve adherence to drug regimen. Subjects completed the Jette Functional Status Inventory (FSI Assistance, Pain, Difficulty scales), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI Affective, Somatic scales), Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL Appraisal, Belonging, Self-Esteem, Tangible scales), and exercise and demographic questionnaires. Sample: Subjects (N=410) were recruited from rheumatology practices, fulfilled American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA, were ³ 30 years of age, and had RA for ³ 2 years. Subjects were 59.1 +/- 11.2 years of age, had RA for 14.0 +/- 9.6 years, were white (93%), female (78%), married (72%), and had 12.6 +/- 2.4 years of education. Results: Fifty-six percent (n=230) of subjects reported some type of regular exercise. These subjects exercised 4.6 +/- 2.2 days based on a 7-day recall. Types of exercises included ROM (55%), walking (36%), cycling (11%), and swimming (7%). Reasons exercise was missed were disruptions in daily routine (37%), no time for exercise (18%), RA symptoms (17%), forgot (8%), bad weather (7%), too tired (7%), and traveling (7%). Hierarchical stepwise regression with age, sex, and race entered in the first step and FSI, BDI, and ISEL scores entered in the second step in a backward fashion showed that FSI: Assistance and FSI: Difficulty explained the greatest variance in exercise frequency in the past 7 days [DF(2,181)=3.783, DR2=.039, p=.025]. Conclusions: Over half of RA subjects reported exercising. Of these, over half performed ROM (31% of total), and over one-third reported walking (20% of total). Persons with RA face common barriers to exercise as well as the barrier of RA symptoms. Age, assistance used and difficulty involved in performing activities of daily living predicted exercise frequency. Implications: Interventions to improve adherence to exercise regimen in RA should address exercise barriers, such as disruptions in daily routine, time constraints, and disease symptoms, and should consider age and functional status.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of exercise in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchlenk, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Schlenk, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: els100@pitt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163462-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purposes of this study were to describe exercise levels, types of exercise, and reasons for missing exercise; and to identify functional status, depression, and social support predictors of exercise among persons with RA controlling for demographics. Research Questions: What are the exercise levels, types of exercise, and reasons for missing exercise in persons with RA? Controlling for demographics, do functional status, depression, and social support predict exercise in persons with RA? Framework: Pender's Health Promotion Model provided the framework for this study. Methods: A correlational descriptive design was used in this secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial designed to improve adherence to drug regimen. Subjects completed the Jette Functional Status Inventory (FSI Assistance, Pain, Difficulty scales), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI Affective, Somatic scales), Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL Appraisal, Belonging, Self-Esteem, Tangible scales), and exercise and demographic questionnaires. Sample: Subjects (N=410) were recruited from rheumatology practices, fulfilled American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA, were ³ 30 years of age, and had RA for ³ 2 years. Subjects were 59.1 +/- 11.2 years of age, had RA for 14.0 +/- 9.6 years, were white (93%), female (78%), married (72%), and had 12.6 +/- 2.4 years of education. Results: Fifty-six percent (n=230) of subjects reported some type of regular exercise. These subjects exercised 4.6 +/- 2.2 days based on a 7-day recall. Types of exercises included ROM (55%), walking (36%), cycling (11%), and swimming (7%). Reasons exercise was missed were disruptions in daily routine (37%), no time for exercise (18%), RA symptoms (17%), forgot (8%), bad weather (7%), too tired (7%), and traveling (7%). Hierarchical stepwise regression with age, sex, and race entered in the first step and FSI, BDI, and ISEL scores entered in the second step in a backward fashion showed that FSI: Assistance and FSI: Difficulty explained the greatest variance in exercise frequency in the past 7 days [DF(2,181)=3.783, DR2=.039, p=.025]. Conclusions: Over half of RA subjects reported exercising. Of these, over half performed ROM (31% of total), and over one-third reported walking (20% of total). Persons with RA face common barriers to exercise as well as the barrier of RA symptoms. Age, assistance used and difficulty involved in performing activities of daily living predicted exercise frequency. Implications: Interventions to improve adherence to exercise regimen in RA should address exercise barriers, such as disruptions in daily routine, time constraints, and disease symptoms, and should consider age and functional status.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:01Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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