2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163467
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coming back normal: Recovery of self in those with schizophrenia
Author(s):
Shea, Joyce
Author Details:
Joyce Shea, B.S., M.S.N., D.N.Sc., Associate Professor of Nursing, Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA, email: jshea@fairfield.edu
Abstract:
In spite of recent advances in treatment, individuals with schizophrenia continue to face many challenges in their attempts to adjust to community living and achieve recovery. The purpose of this study was to increase understanding of factors that influence community integration and recovery from schizophrenia. Personal accounts of the illness experience often cite the significance of changes in identity over time. Loss of self has been identified as a major factor leading to the chronicity associated with schizophrenia. A functional sense of self has been linked to the recovery process itself. Guided by the concepts of identity and illness, the specific aim of this grounded theory study was to describe the process of self-identity recovery in people with schizophrenia who are living in the community. Through a purposive selection process, ten participants who were in active outpatient mental health treatment were recruited through their primary clinician. All participants had a primary diagnosis of a schizophrenic disorder, were between 33 and 62 years old, and spoke English. There were five men and five women; two of the men and two of the women were African-American and the remainder were Caucasian. Each participant completed one semi-structured interview. In addition, five follow-up interviews were conducted over a period of two years to further understand changes in self-identity over time. Initial data analysis also led to the theoretical selection of and interviews with four individuals who were clinicians, friends, or family members of the participants. Data were analyzed using the constant comparison method, and findings revealed a core process of self-recovery experienced by those with schizophrenia. Participants described the multiple losses that occurred when they entered the territory of mental illness, including the loss of self. On a daily basis, they faced tremendous struggles with illness, self, others, and life. They took actions to deal with the struggles, including following daily routines and forcing the self to do what was necessary, redefining themselves in terms of their illness and others, and finding the places or roles where they felt comfortable. They moved forward, and at times fell back, as they went through the process of rediscovering and recreating a new self. Some reached the final outcome of "Coming Back Normal", when the self had been recovered and the struggles were not so overwhelming. Conditions that appeared to facilitate or impede the process of self-recovery included the concept of self before the onset of illness, the quality of relationships with others, and the extent of the elaboration of the current self-identity. Knowledge of this complex process allows nurses and other mental health care providers to facilitate the recovery of self in individuals with schizophrenia, increase the level of their community adjustment, improve the overall quality of their lives, and ultimately move them toward recovery from the mental illness itself.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComing back normal: Recovery of self in those with schizophreniaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorShea, Joyceen_US
dc.author.detailsJoyce Shea, B.S., M.S.N., D.N.Sc., Associate Professor of Nursing, Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA, email: jshea@fairfield.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163467-
dc.description.abstractIn spite of recent advances in treatment, individuals with schizophrenia continue to face many challenges in their attempts to adjust to community living and achieve recovery. The purpose of this study was to increase understanding of factors that influence community integration and recovery from schizophrenia. Personal accounts of the illness experience often cite the significance of changes in identity over time. Loss of self has been identified as a major factor leading to the chronicity associated with schizophrenia. A functional sense of self has been linked to the recovery process itself. Guided by the concepts of identity and illness, the specific aim of this grounded theory study was to describe the process of self-identity recovery in people with schizophrenia who are living in the community. Through a purposive selection process, ten participants who were in active outpatient mental health treatment were recruited through their primary clinician. All participants had a primary diagnosis of a schizophrenic disorder, were between 33 and 62 years old, and spoke English. There were five men and five women; two of the men and two of the women were African-American and the remainder were Caucasian. Each participant completed one semi-structured interview. In addition, five follow-up interviews were conducted over a period of two years to further understand changes in self-identity over time. Initial data analysis also led to the theoretical selection of and interviews with four individuals who were clinicians, friends, or family members of the participants. Data were analyzed using the constant comparison method, and findings revealed a core process of self-recovery experienced by those with schizophrenia. Participants described the multiple losses that occurred when they entered the territory of mental illness, including the loss of self. On a daily basis, they faced tremendous struggles with illness, self, others, and life. They took actions to deal with the struggles, including following daily routines and forcing the self to do what was necessary, redefining themselves in terms of their illness and others, and finding the places or roles where they felt comfortable. They moved forward, and at times fell back, as they went through the process of rediscovering and recreating a new self. Some reached the final outcome of "Coming Back Normal", when the self had been recovered and the struggles were not so overwhelming. Conditions that appeared to facilitate or impede the process of self-recovery included the concept of self before the onset of illness, the quality of relationships with others, and the extent of the elaboration of the current self-identity. Knowledge of this complex process allows nurses and other mental health care providers to facilitate the recovery of self in individuals with schizophrenia, increase the level of their community adjustment, improve the overall quality of their lives, and ultimately move them toward recovery from the mental illness itself.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:06Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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