2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163469
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A grounded theory study of living in a nursing home as a working age adult
Author(s):
Specchio, Eileen
Author Details:
Eileen Specchio, College of St. Elizabeth, Chester, New Jersey, especchio@cse.edu
Abstract:
Twelve percent of the total nursing home residents are working-age adults (under 65 years of age). Little research exists on what it is like to live in a nursing home as a working-age adult. The purpose of this grounded theory study is to describe and explain what it is like for working-age adults to live in a nursing home and to develop a substantive theory of what basic psychosocial processes are used to manage their working-age lives while living in a nursing home. Purposive sampling of working-age adults currently living in a nursing home will be used to achieve maximum phenomenal variation. Demographic variation will be documented. Theoretical variation will direct the sampling process. Data will be collected by personal journaling, participant observation, intensive interviews and group discussion with the residents on their life experiences and will be analyzed using constant comparative analysis to modify succeeding interviews. This theoretical sampling process will be repeated until the data are saturated as noted by a redundancy of data. Alert, oriented English speaking residents who are 21-64 years old experiencing difficulty in at least one of the activities of daily living and who reside in a nursing home in New Jersey will serve as the focus of the study. The shared symbols of language, gestures, verbal and nonverbal communication will be explored to discover how working-age nursing home residents define their reality. This representation will be analyzed to identify the basic psychological and social processes involved in living in a nursing home as a working-age adult. Understanding the processes involved in living in a nursing home as a working-age adult is an important step in meeting the needs of this invisible population. It is anticipated that this research will provide a theoretical framework within which interventions for working-age adults can be formulated and implemented. This growing population's needs must be assessed to facilitate the design and development of programs to match their needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA grounded theory study of living in a nursing home as a working age adulten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSpecchio, Eileenen_US
dc.author.detailsEileen Specchio, College of St. Elizabeth, Chester, New Jersey, especchio@cse.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163469-
dc.description.abstractTwelve percent of the total nursing home residents are working-age adults (under 65 years of age). Little research exists on what it is like to live in a nursing home as a working-age adult. The purpose of this grounded theory study is to describe and explain what it is like for working-age adults to live in a nursing home and to develop a substantive theory of what basic psychosocial processes are used to manage their working-age lives while living in a nursing home. Purposive sampling of working-age adults currently living in a nursing home will be used to achieve maximum phenomenal variation. Demographic variation will be documented. Theoretical variation will direct the sampling process. Data will be collected by personal journaling, participant observation, intensive interviews and group discussion with the residents on their life experiences and will be analyzed using constant comparative analysis to modify succeeding interviews. This theoretical sampling process will be repeated until the data are saturated as noted by a redundancy of data. Alert, oriented English speaking residents who are 21-64 years old experiencing difficulty in at least one of the activities of daily living and who reside in a nursing home in New Jersey will serve as the focus of the study. The shared symbols of language, gestures, verbal and nonverbal communication will be explored to discover how working-age nursing home residents define their reality. This representation will be analyzed to identify the basic psychological and social processes involved in living in a nursing home as a working-age adult. Understanding the processes involved in living in a nursing home as a working-age adult is an important step in meeting the needs of this invisible population. It is anticipated that this research will provide a theoretical framework within which interventions for working-age adults can be formulated and implemented. This growing population's needs must be assessed to facilitate the design and development of programs to match their needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:07Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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