A pilot study to evaluate validity and reliability of the self-reported role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163470
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A pilot study to evaluate validity and reliability of the self-reported role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings survey
Author(s):
Stark, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon W Stark, PhD, RN, APN-C, Professor, Monmouth University, Matawan, New Jersey, USA, email: swstark@monmouth.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Psychometric evaluation of an instrument to measure the differences in APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings among APNs educated in specialized CNS or NP, combined CNS and NP, post-master's NP, and post-master's CNS certificate programs. Specific Aim: To evaluate for validity and reliability, the researcher designed Self-Reported Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settings Survey (CFPS). Methods and Validity: A panel of six content experts reviewed the CFPS for content validity. The panel included a CNS nurse educator, a NP nurse educator, a CNS educated as a CNS and currently practicing in the role of a CNS, a NP educated as a NP and currently practicing in the role of a NP, and a CNS who received a NP post-master's certificate and is currently practicing in the role of a NP. In choosing the panel of experts the researcher included those individuals who are involved in shaping role development as an APN (educators) and implementing APN roles (practicing NPs and CNSs). The panel evaluated each item for congruence, readability, accuracy, representativeness, content relevance, and possible offensive language (Berk, 1990). Each item was rated from 1 for "no relevance" to 4 for "very relevant" for the categories of role choices, role flexibility and practice settings in which individual items are placed. A content validity index (CVI) was calculated from the proportion of items that received a 3 to 4 rating. Since 5 content experts evaluated instrument items, an acceptable overall content validity index (CVI) for the total CFPS instrument is .80 (Lynn, 1986a). The CVI for each subscale of the CFPS supports that the instrument is valid: Expert Clinician Activities (1.0), Consultant Activities (.94), Educator Activities (1.0), Leader Activities (.94), and Researcher Activities (1.0). The total CVI score for CFPS is .96. Therefore, the instrument is assessed to be content valid. The CFPS instrument was revised according to the panels' suggestions prior to sending the pilot surveys. All items remained on the pilot CFPS survey. After obtaining permission from Widener University School of Nursing Research Committee, a pilot study was conducted. Fifty practicing CNSs and NPS who were readily accessible to participate in the pilot study were contacted by telephone, internet, and person to person communication with the researcher. An effort was made by the researcher to represent equally, master's prepared CNSs and NPs educated in a specialized CNS or NP curriculum, a combined curriculum, a post-master's NP certificate, and a post-master's CNS certificate in the pilot study. A survey packet (containing a cover letter that explained the survey, timeline for the survey to be returned, the CFPS, and a questionnaire requesting comments regarding the overall quality of the survey, clarity of instructions, identification of instrument items that were problematic, and the time it took to complete the survey) was mailed to 50 APNs who agreed to participate in the pilot study. Participants were asked to return the survey within 14 days. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), Version 10, computer program. Surveys were reviewed and coded by the researcher for computer entry. Frequency distributions were computed on the demographic characteristics of the sample, and the total scores of all participants on role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings on the CFPS survey. The sample data were evaluated for the CFPS distribution of scores as well as measures of central tendency and dispersion. Role Choices and Practice Settings subscale scores were ratio level scores for data analysis. Role Flexibility subscale scores were interval level scores for data analysis. Results: There was a 68% return rate of the CFPS survey (N = 34). One participant did not answer any items in the Consultant Activities of the Role Flexibility subscale. Two participants did not identify their basic nursing education. Two participants did not enter the number of years they practiced as an RN. One participant did not identify a current APN practice. Two participants did not identify the amount of time it took to complete the survey. Scores for missing data were managed by totaling and dividing scores by the number of responses. The majority of participants were white (n = 32), female (n = 28) APNs. The remaining participants included 6 male, one black, and one Hispanic female. The mean age of participants was 45 years. Most respondents graduated from specialized NP programs (n = 12), and were practicing in NP roles. Six respondents graduated from specialized CNS programs, and were practicing in CNS roles. All nine CNSs who graduated from post-master's NP certificate programs were practicing in NP roles. Of the four participants who graduated from combined CNS/NP programs, two were practicing as NPs, and two were practicing in combined CNS/NP roles. Participants have been in APN practice an average of 11 years. Reliability: Alpha can range from .0 to + 1.0. A higher value indicates greater internal consistency. An acceptable overall Cronbach's alpha value is .80 for the total CFPS instrument and .70 for each subscale (Polit, 1996). The Cronbach alpha for each CFPS subscale is : Expert Clinician Activities (r = .76), Consultant Activities (r = .91), Educator Activities (r = .84), Leader Activities (r = .82), and Researcher Activities (r = .80). The overall Cronbach alpha for the total CFPS instrument is .88.Therefore, the CFPS instrument is reliable. Conclusion: CFPS was revised and refined in keeping with the results of the pilot study by modifying and clarifying those items that were indicated as troublesome by participants in the pilot study (Dillman, 2000). Consultant Activities subscale, number 20, " Select clients for care" was changed to "Screen clients for care". A request for the year of graduation from master's CNS or NP program was added to the Demographic Survey. Results of this study support initial validity and reliability of the CFPS instrument. Implications: The CFPS is an appropriate instrument to use in the investigation of effects of CNS and NP education on role choices, role flexibility and practice settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA pilot study to evaluate validity and reliability of the self-reported role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings surveyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStark, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon W Stark, PhD, RN, APN-C, Professor, Monmouth University, Matawan, New Jersey, USA, email: swstark@monmouth.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163470-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Psychometric evaluation of an instrument to measure the differences in APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings among APNs educated in specialized CNS or NP, combined CNS and NP, post-master's NP, and post-master's CNS certificate programs. Specific Aim: To evaluate for validity and reliability, the researcher designed Self-Reported Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settings Survey (CFPS). Methods and Validity: A panel of six content experts reviewed the CFPS for content validity. The panel included a CNS nurse educator, a NP nurse educator, a CNS educated as a CNS and currently practicing in the role of a CNS, a NP educated as a NP and currently practicing in the role of a NP, and a CNS who received a NP post-master's certificate and is currently practicing in the role of a NP. In choosing the panel of experts the researcher included those individuals who are involved in shaping role development as an APN (educators) and implementing APN roles (practicing NPs and CNSs). The panel evaluated each item for congruence, readability, accuracy, representativeness, content relevance, and possible offensive language (Berk, 1990). Each item was rated from 1 for "no relevance" to 4 for "very relevant" for the categories of role choices, role flexibility and practice settings in which individual items are placed. A content validity index (CVI) was calculated from the proportion of items that received a 3 to 4 rating. Since 5 content experts evaluated instrument items, an acceptable overall content validity index (CVI) for the total CFPS instrument is .80 (Lynn, 1986a). The CVI for each subscale of the CFPS supports that the instrument is valid: Expert Clinician Activities (1.0), Consultant Activities (.94), Educator Activities (1.0), Leader Activities (.94), and Researcher Activities (1.0). The total CVI score for CFPS is .96. Therefore, the instrument is assessed to be content valid. The CFPS instrument was revised according to the panels' suggestions prior to sending the pilot surveys. All items remained on the pilot CFPS survey. After obtaining permission from Widener University School of Nursing Research Committee, a pilot study was conducted. Fifty practicing CNSs and NPS who were readily accessible to participate in the pilot study were contacted by telephone, internet, and person to person communication with the researcher. An effort was made by the researcher to represent equally, master's prepared CNSs and NPs educated in a specialized CNS or NP curriculum, a combined curriculum, a post-master's NP certificate, and a post-master's CNS certificate in the pilot study. A survey packet (containing a cover letter that explained the survey, timeline for the survey to be returned, the CFPS, and a questionnaire requesting comments regarding the overall quality of the survey, clarity of instructions, identification of instrument items that were problematic, and the time it took to complete the survey) was mailed to 50 APNs who agreed to participate in the pilot study. Participants were asked to return the survey within 14 days. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), Version 10, computer program. Surveys were reviewed and coded by the researcher for computer entry. Frequency distributions were computed on the demographic characteristics of the sample, and the total scores of all participants on role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings on the CFPS survey. The sample data were evaluated for the CFPS distribution of scores as well as measures of central tendency and dispersion. Role Choices and Practice Settings subscale scores were ratio level scores for data analysis. Role Flexibility subscale scores were interval level scores for data analysis. Results: There was a 68% return rate of the CFPS survey (N = 34). One participant did not answer any items in the Consultant Activities of the Role Flexibility subscale. Two participants did not identify their basic nursing education. Two participants did not enter the number of years they practiced as an RN. One participant did not identify a current APN practice. Two participants did not identify the amount of time it took to complete the survey. Scores for missing data were managed by totaling and dividing scores by the number of responses. The majority of participants were white (n = 32), female (n = 28) APNs. The remaining participants included 6 male, one black, and one Hispanic female. The mean age of participants was 45 years. Most respondents graduated from specialized NP programs (n = 12), and were practicing in NP roles. Six respondents graduated from specialized CNS programs, and were practicing in CNS roles. All nine CNSs who graduated from post-master's NP certificate programs were practicing in NP roles. Of the four participants who graduated from combined CNS/NP programs, two were practicing as NPs, and two were practicing in combined CNS/NP roles. Participants have been in APN practice an average of 11 years. Reliability: Alpha can range from .0 to + 1.0. A higher value indicates greater internal consistency. An acceptable overall Cronbach's alpha value is .80 for the total CFPS instrument and .70 for each subscale (Polit, 1996). The Cronbach alpha for each CFPS subscale is : Expert Clinician Activities (r = .76), Consultant Activities (r = .91), Educator Activities (r = .84), Leader Activities (r = .82), and Researcher Activities (r = .80). The overall Cronbach alpha for the total CFPS instrument is .88.Therefore, the CFPS instrument is reliable. Conclusion: CFPS was revised and refined in keeping with the results of the pilot study by modifying and clarifying those items that were indicated as troublesome by participants in the pilot study (Dillman, 2000). Consultant Activities subscale, number 20, " Select clients for care" was changed to "Screen clients for care". A request for the year of graduation from master's CNS or NP program was added to the Demographic Survey. Results of this study support initial validity and reliability of the CFPS instrument. Implications: The CFPS is an appropriate instrument to use in the investigation of effects of CNS and NP education on role choices, role flexibility and practice settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:08Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.