The effects of clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner master's education on role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163471
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner master's education on role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings
Author(s):
Stark, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon W Stark, PhD, RN, APN-C, Professor, Monmouth University, Matawan, New Jersey, USA, email: swstark@monmouth.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive comparative study is to explore the differences in APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings among CNSs and NPs educated in a specialized CNS or NP curriculum, CNSs and NPs educated in a combined curriculum, CNSs educated in a curriculum for a post-master's NP certificate, and NPs educated in a curriculum for a post-masters CNS certificate. Research Question: Do CNSs and NPs educated in a specialized CNS or NP curriculum, CNSs and NPs educated in a combined curriculum, CNSs with post-master's NP education and NPs with post-master's CNS education differ in actual APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings? Framework: This study will be guided by role theory as portrayed by Biddle and Thomas (1979). Role theory incorporates a variety of concepts and hypotheses that predict how individuals will behave in their perspective societal roles, and what circumstances will evoke certain types of behaviors within those specific societal roles (Biddle & Thomas, 1979. Methods: A stratified, random, national sample consisting of 10% of each type of CNS and NP, NLNAC or CCNE accredited nursing master's program in the continental United States will be selected by the researcher from regions designated by NLNAC. Subjects will be self-selected so that there are equal numbers of master's prepared CNSs and NPs educated in specialized CNS or NP, combined CNS or NP, post-master's CNS certificate, and a post-master's NP certificate programs in the sample. Since there are fewer combined CNS and NP programs, all of them will be invited to participate to ensure that their numbers are represented with numbers comparable to specialized CNS, NP, and post-master's certificate programs. A mailed survey using the Dillman's Survey method by which data collection will involve three mailings (initial and two follow-up reminders) to the same list of randomly selected CNS and NP alumni from each type of NLNAC and CCNE accredited master's programs. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) will measure differences among th five groups in relation to role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings. An ANOVA will be computed to compare the five groups for differences in actual and preferred APN role choices in each of the five APN roles. Then the five groups will be compared on a role mean difference score using ANOVA. Pearson correlations and Chi -Square analyses will determine relationships between selected demographic variables and scores on the subscales of the CFPS. Conclusions: This study will begin in September 2001. Data Collection will be completed in November, 2001. Results will be written by February 2002 and ready for presentation for the ENRS conference in March. Implications: Master's education that explores APN roles in multiple practice settings may increase APN role choices, role flexibility, expand practice settings and thereby enhance APN practice options. Investigating APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings of graduates from master's level CNS and NP programs may reveal information about a single versus a combined curriculum that will establish standardization for CNS and NP education that would be most supportive of inclusive APN practice. The changing health care environment has created an atmosphere that is ideal for promoting and establishing comprehensive delivery of healthcare by APNs who have the ability to adapt to roles that complement diverse practice settings. The broader knowledge base that a combined education provides to CNS and NP graduates may increase practice options that are proffered by the changes in health care delivery systems and practice settings. The benefits of an APN with a strong clinical background in an administrative position may include providing a practice environment that is conducive to improving overall quality of nursing practice and patient care. The APN administrator who has an understanding of the enterprising nature of health care organizations and who is able to respond to clinical, organizational, and economic challenges in health care may be better prepared to facilitate stronger nursing and patient advocacy. The ability to accommodate changes in roles and in practice reflects the viability of the APN in present day health care systems, the preservation of the APN roles within healthcare organizations, and the development of new roles within APN practice. Role theory is critical to gain understanding of dynamic and evolving APN roles and to provide a well-informed guide to curricular development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner master's education on role choices, role flexibility, and practice settingsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStark, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon W Stark, PhD, RN, APN-C, Professor, Monmouth University, Matawan, New Jersey, USA, email: swstark@monmouth.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163471-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this descriptive comparative study is to explore the differences in APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings among CNSs and NPs educated in a specialized CNS or NP curriculum, CNSs and NPs educated in a combined curriculum, CNSs educated in a curriculum for a post-master's NP certificate, and NPs educated in a curriculum for a post-masters CNS certificate. Research Question: Do CNSs and NPs educated in a specialized CNS or NP curriculum, CNSs and NPs educated in a combined curriculum, CNSs with post-master's NP education and NPs with post-master's CNS education differ in actual APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings? Framework: This study will be guided by role theory as portrayed by Biddle and Thomas (1979). Role theory incorporates a variety of concepts and hypotheses that predict how individuals will behave in their perspective societal roles, and what circumstances will evoke certain types of behaviors within those specific societal roles (Biddle & Thomas, 1979. Methods: A stratified, random, national sample consisting of 10% of each type of CNS and NP, NLNAC or CCNE accredited nursing master's program in the continental United States will be selected by the researcher from regions designated by NLNAC. Subjects will be self-selected so that there are equal numbers of master's prepared CNSs and NPs educated in specialized CNS or NP, combined CNS or NP, post-master's CNS certificate, and a post-master's NP certificate programs in the sample. Since there are fewer combined CNS and NP programs, all of them will be invited to participate to ensure that their numbers are represented with numbers comparable to specialized CNS, NP, and post-master's certificate programs. A mailed survey using the Dillman's Survey method by which data collection will involve three mailings (initial and two follow-up reminders) to the same list of randomly selected CNS and NP alumni from each type of NLNAC and CCNE accredited master's programs. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) will measure differences among th five groups in relation to role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings. An ANOVA will be computed to compare the five groups for differences in actual and preferred APN role choices in each of the five APN roles. Then the five groups will be compared on a role mean difference score using ANOVA. Pearson correlations and Chi -Square analyses will determine relationships between selected demographic variables and scores on the subscales of the CFPS. Conclusions: This study will begin in September 2001. Data Collection will be completed in November, 2001. Results will be written by February 2002 and ready for presentation for the ENRS conference in March. Implications: Master's education that explores APN roles in multiple practice settings may increase APN role choices, role flexibility, expand practice settings and thereby enhance APN practice options. Investigating APN role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings of graduates from master's level CNS and NP programs may reveal information about a single versus a combined curriculum that will establish standardization for CNS and NP education that would be most supportive of inclusive APN practice. The changing health care environment has created an atmosphere that is ideal for promoting and establishing comprehensive delivery of healthcare by APNs who have the ability to adapt to roles that complement diverse practice settings. The broader knowledge base that a combined education provides to CNS and NP graduates may increase practice options that are proffered by the changes in health care delivery systems and practice settings. The benefits of an APN with a strong clinical background in an administrative position may include providing a practice environment that is conducive to improving overall quality of nursing practice and patient care. The APN administrator who has an understanding of the enterprising nature of health care organizations and who is able to respond to clinical, organizational, and economic challenges in health care may be better prepared to facilitate stronger nursing and patient advocacy. The ability to accommodate changes in roles and in practice reflects the viability of the APN in present day health care systems, the preservation of the APN roles within healthcare organizations, and the development of new roles within APN practice. Role theory is critical to gain understanding of dynamic and evolving APN roles and to provide a well-informed guide to curricular development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:09Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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