Coping, resources, type of breast surgery and the health of women with breast cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163472
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping, resources, type of breast surgery and the health of women with breast cancer
Author(s):
Sternas, Kathleen; Frager, D.; Olympia, E.; Dillion, D.; Bolno, S.; Ross, R.|Honey, J. Hoefling
Author Details:
Kathleen Sternas, Associate Professor, Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, Verona, New Jersey, USA, email: sternaka@shu.edu; D. Frager; E. Olympia; D. Dillion; S. Bolno; R. Ross; J. Hoefling Honey
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and is a stressful experience for women. Studies have found poor quality of life and increased emotional distress among breast cancer patients. Factors which can impact on health after breast cancer include ways of coping, resources, and type of surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate: the ways women cope; types of resources used; impact of type of breast surgery; and the health of women with early stage breast cancer. Specific aims included: identification of factors related to positive health outcomes for women with breast cancer; and identification of similarities and differences between mastectomy and lumpectomy patients on coping, resources and physical and emotional health. Lazarus and Folkman's stress-appraisal-coping framework guided the study. Sample selection criteria included women aged 29 to 80 (n=47) who were to have a mastectomy (n=33) or lumpectomy (n=14) of Black, White or Hispanic ethnicity. Methods: Patients were referred by surgeons. A letter of explanation was shared with the women with telephone follow-up to ascertain interest in participating and if inclusion criteria were met. Subjects were interviewed by a nurse prior to breast surgery. Instruments included the Ways of Coping Revised, Assessment of Resources, Self-Rating of Physical Health and Profile of Mood States. Results: Ways of coping used quite a bit or a great deal were: concentrated on what I had to do next; analyzed the problem; turned to work or activity to take my mind off things; prayed; talked to someone; tried to look on the bright side of things; accepted sympathy and understanding; got professional help; changed or grew in a good way; made a plan and followed it; let my feelings out; came out of the experience better than when I went in; rediscovered what is important in life; asked for advice; doubled my efforts to make things work; accepted it; wished I could change what had happened; tried to see things from others points of view; and reminded myself how much worse things could be. Lumpectomy patients used more escape-avoidance coping than mastectomy patients ( t=-2.07, p< .05). Women having a mastectomy versus a lumpectomy did not differ in their use of confrontive, distancing, self-controlling, seeks social support, accepts responsibility, planful problem solving and positive reappraisal coping. Key resources which helped to reduce stress and promote positive health outcomes were: helpful social supports and use of support groups (American Cancer Society programs, New Life, church support group); religious beliefs; cultural practices ( use of cat claw to cure cancer); previous experiences with health-related losses; grieving; letting out emotions; belief in control over the future; adequate finances; good relationships with family and friends; and good mental-emotional health. Many women did not practice good breast care (breast self-examination, yearly mammograms), did not exercise, and were not eating a low fat or balanced diet. With respect to health, lumpectomy patients had more vigor than mastectomy patients (t=-2.31, p < .05). There were no statistical differences in tension-anxiety, depression, anger-hostility, confusion, fatigue and total mood disturbance or in self-rating of physical health for type of surgery. In conclusion, women used a variety of ways of coping and used helpful resources to reduce the stress of breast cancer and promote positive health outcomes. Mastectomy and lumpectomy patients are more similar than different in their coping, resources and physical health ratings before breast surgery. Implications for nursing focus on educating women on helpful coping strategies and resources since these factors can impact on health. The use of Lazarus and Folkman's theoretical framework for knowledge development in nursing in the area of breast cancer research is explored. Replication of this study with a larger sample of women is recommended.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping, resources, type of breast surgery and the health of women with breast canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSternas, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrager, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOlympia, E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDillion, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBolno, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, R.|Honey, J. Hoeflingen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Sternas, Associate Professor, Seton Hall University, College of Nursing, Verona, New Jersey, USA, email: sternaka@shu.edu; D. Frager; E. Olympia; D. Dillion; S. Bolno; R. Ross; J. Hoefling Honeyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163472-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the most common cancer among women and is a stressful experience for women. Studies have found poor quality of life and increased emotional distress among breast cancer patients. Factors which can impact on health after breast cancer include ways of coping, resources, and type of surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate: the ways women cope; types of resources used; impact of type of breast surgery; and the health of women with early stage breast cancer. Specific aims included: identification of factors related to positive health outcomes for women with breast cancer; and identification of similarities and differences between mastectomy and lumpectomy patients on coping, resources and physical and emotional health. Lazarus and Folkman's stress-appraisal-coping framework guided the study. Sample selection criteria included women aged 29 to 80 (n=47) who were to have a mastectomy (n=33) or lumpectomy (n=14) of Black, White or Hispanic ethnicity. Methods: Patients were referred by surgeons. A letter of explanation was shared with the women with telephone follow-up to ascertain interest in participating and if inclusion criteria were met. Subjects were interviewed by a nurse prior to breast surgery. Instruments included the Ways of Coping Revised, Assessment of Resources, Self-Rating of Physical Health and Profile of Mood States. Results: Ways of coping used quite a bit or a great deal were: concentrated on what I had to do next; analyzed the problem; turned to work or activity to take my mind off things; prayed; talked to someone; tried to look on the bright side of things; accepted sympathy and understanding; got professional help; changed or grew in a good way; made a plan and followed it; let my feelings out; came out of the experience better than when I went in; rediscovered what is important in life; asked for advice; doubled my efforts to make things work; accepted it; wished I could change what had happened; tried to see things from others points of view; and reminded myself how much worse things could be. Lumpectomy patients used more escape-avoidance coping than mastectomy patients ( t=-2.07, p< .05). Women having a mastectomy versus a lumpectomy did not differ in their use of confrontive, distancing, self-controlling, seeks social support, accepts responsibility, planful problem solving and positive reappraisal coping. Key resources which helped to reduce stress and promote positive health outcomes were: helpful social supports and use of support groups (American Cancer Society programs, New Life, church support group); religious beliefs; cultural practices ( use of cat claw to cure cancer); previous experiences with health-related losses; grieving; letting out emotions; belief in control over the future; adequate finances; good relationships with family and friends; and good mental-emotional health. Many women did not practice good breast care (breast self-examination, yearly mammograms), did not exercise, and were not eating a low fat or balanced diet. With respect to health, lumpectomy patients had more vigor than mastectomy patients (t=-2.31, p < .05). There were no statistical differences in tension-anxiety, depression, anger-hostility, confusion, fatigue and total mood disturbance or in self-rating of physical health for type of surgery. In conclusion, women used a variety of ways of coping and used helpful resources to reduce the stress of breast cancer and promote positive health outcomes. Mastectomy and lumpectomy patients are more similar than different in their coping, resources and physical health ratings before breast surgery. Implications for nursing focus on educating women on helpful coping strategies and resources since these factors can impact on health. The use of Lazarus and Folkman's theoretical framework for knowledge development in nursing in the area of breast cancer research is explored. Replication of this study with a larger sample of women is recommended.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:10Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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