2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163473
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methodological considerations in economic evaluations
Author(s):
Stone, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Stone, Assistant Professor, Columbia University, School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: ps2024@columbia.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: It is no longer sufficient simply to assess the efficacy of an intervention. Increasingly, economic evidence is also considered before an effective intervention is adopted into practice. The purpose of this presentation is to familiarize nurses with types of economic analyses available and a systematic audit of economic evidence of nosocomial infections (NIs) and infection control personnel are used as an example. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this presentation are to 1) review the types of economic analyses available to nurse researchers 2) review the published economic evidence available on the attributable cost of NIs, 3) review the published economic evidence available on interventions conducted by infection control personnel, and 4) evaluate the methods employed in these analyses. Framework: Guidelines on the conduct of systematic audits were followed. Methods: A search of MEDLINE and HealthSTAR using medical subject headings or text words "nosocomial infections", "infection control", or "hospital acquired infections" cross referenced with "costs", "cost analysis", "economics", or "cost-effectiveness analysis" was conducted. References of published review articles were also searched. Articles were considered eligible for inclusion in the audit if published between 1990 to 2000, had an abstract, contained an original cost estimate, and written in English. Descriptive and analytic data were collected. Cost results were standardized into a common currency, 2000 U.S. dollars. Results and Conclusions: Fifty-five studies were eligible. Approximately one-quarter examined NIs in intensive care patients (n=13). Occupational health care interventions were studied almost as often (n=12). Most studies were conducted from the hospital perspective (n=48). Only one study used quality-adjusted life years gained as an outcome measure. The costs attributable to blood stream (mean=$38,703) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSRA) infections (mean=$35,367) were the largest. Increased standardization and rigor are needed. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: Based on this assessment of the state-of-the-science in economic evaluation related to NI there is a need for increased standardization and rigor in the economic analyses available. Nurse researchers and clinicians should partner with economists and policy analysts to expand and improve the economic evidence available.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethodological considerations in economic evaluationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStone, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Stone, Assistant Professor, Columbia University, School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: ps2024@columbia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163473-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: It is no longer sufficient simply to assess the efficacy of an intervention. Increasingly, economic evidence is also considered before an effective intervention is adopted into practice. The purpose of this presentation is to familiarize nurses with types of economic analyses available and a systematic audit of economic evidence of nosocomial infections (NIs) and infection control personnel are used as an example. Specific Aims: The specific aims of this presentation are to 1) review the types of economic analyses available to nurse researchers 2) review the published economic evidence available on the attributable cost of NIs, 3) review the published economic evidence available on interventions conducted by infection control personnel, and 4) evaluate the methods employed in these analyses. Framework: Guidelines on the conduct of systematic audits were followed. Methods: A search of MEDLINE and HealthSTAR using medical subject headings or text words "nosocomial infections", "infection control", or "hospital acquired infections" cross referenced with "costs", "cost analysis", "economics", or "cost-effectiveness analysis" was conducted. References of published review articles were also searched. Articles were considered eligible for inclusion in the audit if published between 1990 to 2000, had an abstract, contained an original cost estimate, and written in English. Descriptive and analytic data were collected. Cost results were standardized into a common currency, 2000 U.S. dollars. Results and Conclusions: Fifty-five studies were eligible. Approximately one-quarter examined NIs in intensive care patients (n=13). Occupational health care interventions were studied almost as often (n=12). Most studies were conducted from the hospital perspective (n=48). Only one study used quality-adjusted life years gained as an outcome measure. The costs attributable to blood stream (mean=$38,703) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSRA) infections (mean=$35,367) were the largest. Increased standardization and rigor are needed. Implications for Nursing Practice and Knowledge Development: Based on this assessment of the state-of-the-science in economic evaluation related to NI there is a need for increased standardization and rigor in the economic analyses available. Nurse researchers and clinicians should partner with economists and policy analysts to expand and improve the economic evidence available.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:11Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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