Homeward-helping other mothers effectively work at raising their young children with type 1 diabetes: A randomized controlled feasibility study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163475
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Homeward-helping other mothers effectively work at raising their young children with type 1 diabetes: A randomized controlled feasibility study
Author(s):
Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Grey, Margaret; Knafl, Kathleen; Deatrick, Janet
Author Details:
Susan Sullivan-Bolyai, DNSc, CNS, RN, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, email: susan.sullivan-bolyai@umassmed.edu; Margaret Grey; Kathleen Knafl; Janet Deatrick
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the feasibility of a postdiagnosis intervention using mother mentors as supplemental support for mothers of newly diagnosed young children (1-10 years old) with type 1 diabetes. Research Aims: 1. Determine if implementing a transitional support system using mother mentors of young children with type 1 diabetes to make home visits and phone contact is feasible. 2. Refine Ireys' mother mentor curriculum to meet the specific affirmational, informational and emotional support needs for mothers raising young children with type 1 diabetes. 3. Compare knowledge, concerns and stress, feelings of competence, sleep patterns, illness, lost work days, and perceptions of access to resources between mothers receiving the intervention and those receiving traditional support at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after diagnosis. 4. Compare metabolic control, emergency room visits, rehospitalizations, phone consultation to diabetes team between children whose mothers receive the intervention and those receiving traditional support at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after diagnosis. Framework: Brooten's Quality-Cost model undergirds the study. Methods: The design is a mixed method prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. A feasibility sample of 40 mothers of children (between 1-10 years old) newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are being recruited from 2 regional diabetes centers in the Northeast and are randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. The intervention consists of mother mentors (who are experienced in raising young children with type 1 diabetes) providing supplemental support to mothers of young children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and includes 5 home visits and 6 phone contacts over a period of 6 months. The primary focus of the visits and calls is to provide informational, affirmational and emotional support and is in no way meant to replace the vital role of the diabetes team members. Medical issues and questions that may arise during the intervention are referred back to the diabetes team. Those assigned to the control group will receive the traditional postdiagnosis support provided by the diabetes team. All mothers complete a battery of questionnaires that focus on the concerns and stresses of day-to-day management, impact on the family, parental competence, and perceived social support and available resources. Data is collected at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after diagnosis. Analysis includes univariate and bivariate descriptions, chi square and t-tests to compare differences in proportions and means between independent and dependent variables, and RANOVA to test differences between the 2 groups over time. Results and conclusions: The quality and cost variable results from the preliminary data analyzed from April 2001 through February 2002 will be presented and discussed. Maternal interview data will also be presented as illustrations of the study findings. Limitations of the intervention study will be discussed as well. Implications for nursing practice: To date, there have been no postdiagnosis parent-to-parent support studies done for families with young children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The outcomes from this study will hopefully provide nurses working closely with these families with a cost-effective way of providing them with additional guidance and support that only someone who has "lived the experience" can provide. This may lead to a less traumatic transition in the early months after diagnosis.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHomeward-helping other mothers effectively work at raising their young children with type 1 diabetes: A randomized controlled feasibility studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan-Bolyai, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrey, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorKnafl, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeatrick, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Sullivan-Bolyai, DNSc, CNS, RN, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, email: susan.sullivan-bolyai@umassmed.edu; Margaret Grey; Kathleen Knafl; Janet Deatricken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163475-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the feasibility of a postdiagnosis intervention using mother mentors as supplemental support for mothers of newly diagnosed young children (1-10 years old) with type 1 diabetes. Research Aims: 1. Determine if implementing a transitional support system using mother mentors of young children with type 1 diabetes to make home visits and phone contact is feasible. 2. Refine Ireys' mother mentor curriculum to meet the specific affirmational, informational and emotional support needs for mothers raising young children with type 1 diabetes. 3. Compare knowledge, concerns and stress, feelings of competence, sleep patterns, illness, lost work days, and perceptions of access to resources between mothers receiving the intervention and those receiving traditional support at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after diagnosis. 4. Compare metabolic control, emergency room visits, rehospitalizations, phone consultation to diabetes team between children whose mothers receive the intervention and those receiving traditional support at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after diagnosis. Framework: Brooten's Quality-Cost model undergirds the study. Methods: The design is a mixed method prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. A feasibility sample of 40 mothers of children (between 1-10 years old) newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are being recruited from 2 regional diabetes centers in the Northeast and are randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. The intervention consists of mother mentors (who are experienced in raising young children with type 1 diabetes) providing supplemental support to mothers of young children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and includes 5 home visits and 6 phone contacts over a period of 6 months. The primary focus of the visits and calls is to provide informational, affirmational and emotional support and is in no way meant to replace the vital role of the diabetes team members. Medical issues and questions that may arise during the intervention are referred back to the diabetes team. Those assigned to the control group will receive the traditional postdiagnosis support provided by the diabetes team. All mothers complete a battery of questionnaires that focus on the concerns and stresses of day-to-day management, impact on the family, parental competence, and perceived social support and available resources. Data is collected at baseline, 1 month and 6 months after diagnosis. Analysis includes univariate and bivariate descriptions, chi square and t-tests to compare differences in proportions and means between independent and dependent variables, and RANOVA to test differences between the 2 groups over time. Results and conclusions: The quality and cost variable results from the preliminary data analyzed from April 2001 through February 2002 will be presented and discussed. Maternal interview data will also be presented as illustrations of the study findings. Limitations of the intervention study will be discussed as well. Implications for nursing practice: To date, there have been no postdiagnosis parent-to-parent support studies done for families with young children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The outcomes from this study will hopefully provide nurses working closely with these families with a cost-effective way of providing them with additional guidance and support that only someone who has "lived the experience" can provide. This may lead to a less traumatic transition in the early months after diagnosis.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:13Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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