The state of the science older African American women and breast cancer: A review of the literature-1990-2001

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163476
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The state of the science older African American women and breast cancer: A review of the literature-1990-2001
Author(s):
Swinney, Jean; L'Heureux, Julie; Schwartzberg, Fran
Author Details:
Jean Swinney, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst , Massachusetts, USA, email: jswinney@nursing.umass.edu; Julie L'Heureux; Fran Schwartzberg
Abstract:
Despite many gains in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer over the past several years, breast cancer remains the most common cause of cancer deaths in women 65 years of age and older. Approximately half of all newly diagnosed breast cancers occur in this age group. In addition, persistent racial and ethnic health disparities between older African American and White American women with breast cancer support the importance of practice informed by scientific inquiry to address gaps between African American and White American women in measures of health outcomes. In view of the persistent challenges facing African American women with cancer, and the public health issues facing health care providers, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. The purposes of this review were to: 1) analyze research addressing the health of African Americans women 65 years of age and older and breast cancer, 2) determine the state of the science regarding older African American women and breast cancer and 3) demonstrate the importance of diligently addressing disparities that continue to exist between older African American and White American women with cancer. The CancerLit, Cinahl, Medline, and Pubmed databases were searched for articles from the period of 1990 - 2001. Key words used were " breast cancer", "African American women", "Black American women", "African American women 65 and older", "Older African American women and breast cancer", and "Older women and breast cancer". Articles included in this review covers the period of 1990-2001. Reviews were examined using a tool based on the work of Jackson (1980) and Ganong (1987). A total of 55 qualitative and quantitative articles were analyzed with sample sizes ranging from N = 25 to N = 223, 098. In conclusion, the literature revealed older African American women were less likely to have received a mammogram than White American women, and present at a later stage and have a lower five-year survival rate than White American women. A majority of the articles reviewed (N= 30) were retrospective studies. Among the weaknesses revealed were; 1) a limited number of quantitative studies, 2) most of the intervention studies (N = 15) used convenience samples, and 3) a paucity of quality data from which to draw epidemiological conclusions. Scientific rigor and the collection of high quality data are critical in assisting health care providers in designing interventions, and measuring the effectiveness of health outcomes with confidence. Decreasing mortality from breast cancer and increasing five-year survival rates in older African American women is important and directly contributes to the Healthy People 2010 goal of reducing the number of new cancer cases as well as illness, disability, and death caused by cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe state of the science older African American women and breast cancer: A review of the literature-1990-2001en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwinney, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorL'Heureux, Julieen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwartzberg, Franen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Swinney, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst , Massachusetts, USA, email: jswinney@nursing.umass.edu; Julie L'Heureux; Fran Schwartzbergen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163476-
dc.description.abstractDespite many gains in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer over the past several years, breast cancer remains the most common cause of cancer deaths in women 65 years of age and older. Approximately half of all newly diagnosed breast cancers occur in this age group. In addition, persistent racial and ethnic health disparities between older African American and White American women with breast cancer support the importance of practice informed by scientific inquiry to address gaps between African American and White American women in measures of health outcomes. In view of the persistent challenges facing African American women with cancer, and the public health issues facing health care providers, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. The purposes of this review were to: 1) analyze research addressing the health of African Americans women 65 years of age and older and breast cancer, 2) determine the state of the science regarding older African American women and breast cancer and 3) demonstrate the importance of diligently addressing disparities that continue to exist between older African American and White American women with cancer. The CancerLit, Cinahl, Medline, and Pubmed databases were searched for articles from the period of 1990 - 2001. Key words used were " breast cancer", "African American women", "Black American women", "African American women 65 and older", "Older African American women and breast cancer", and "Older women and breast cancer". Articles included in this review covers the period of 1990-2001. Reviews were examined using a tool based on the work of Jackson (1980) and Ganong (1987). A total of 55 qualitative and quantitative articles were analyzed with sample sizes ranging from N = 25 to N = 223, 098. In conclusion, the literature revealed older African American women were less likely to have received a mammogram than White American women, and present at a later stage and have a lower five-year survival rate than White American women. A majority of the articles reviewed (N= 30) were retrospective studies. Among the weaknesses revealed were; 1) a limited number of quantitative studies, 2) most of the intervention studies (N = 15) used convenience samples, and 3) a paucity of quality data from which to draw epidemiological conclusions. Scientific rigor and the collection of high quality data are critical in assisting health care providers in designing interventions, and measuring the effectiveness of health outcomes with confidence. Decreasing mortality from breast cancer and increasing five-year survival rates in older African American women is important and directly contributes to the Healthy People 2010 goal of reducing the number of new cancer cases as well as illness, disability, and death caused by cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:14Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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