Instrument translation and evaluation of equivalence and psychometric properties: The Chinese sense of coherence scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163477
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Instrument translation and evaluation of equivalence and psychometric properties: The Chinese sense of coherence scale
Author(s):
Tang, Siew; Dixon, Jane
Author Details:
Siew Tang, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sttang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Jane Dixon
Abstract:
Background: Translating well-established English instruments into target languages other than English and testing cross-cultural validity to prove that the same attributes are being measured in each cultural group or country are necessary before a multicultural or international study can be conducted and cross-cultural comparisons of study results can be applied. However, rigorous and systematic cross-cultural efforts to test the effectiveness of specific translation methods are rare. Purpose of study: This study presents a model of translation processes and empirical validation of the translated instrument through description of the translation of a selected instrument--the Sense of Coherence (SOC) Scale (Antonovsky, 1987)-- from English into Chinese. Methods: Multiple methods were employed to ensure translation quality. A cyclic process of forward translations, back translations, and expert evaluation of equivalence by bilingual Chinese and English speaking experts was conducted to achieve conceptual equivalence between the original and translated instruments. For empirical validation of equivalence, data was obtained from bilingual Chinese people who completed both the 13-item Chinese SOC scale (C-SOC-13) and the comparable English SOC scale (E-SOC-13). Properties of the C-SOC-13 and the E-SOC-13 were compared. Statistical analysis: Translation validity index (TVI) -- a method similar to the computation of Content Validity Index -- was calculated for each item and also for the entire instrument from evaluations of experts. Additionally, the following statistical tests were conducted to evaluate equivalence between the E-SOC-13 and the C-SOC-13: (1) paired t-tests for comparing means of each item, subscale, and total scores; (2) intraclass correlation coefficients for assessing agreements of scores for each item; (3) Cronbach's alpha coefficients for internal consistency reliability; (4) item-total correlations and correlation equality tests for comparing corresponding item-total correlations and; (5) factor analyses for examining the underlying components. Results: After several rounds of assessment and modification of items based on the feedback of experts, the C-SOC-13 captured the essential concept of the E-SOC-13 as reflected by the satisfactory TVIs. Empirical validation of the Chinese SOC scale data demonstrated non-identical, but comparable, item and scale means and variances, internal consistency, item-total correlations, and factor structures. Implications: Only when systematic and scientific procedures are used to translate instruments and evidence of adequate translation is established by empirical validation, will international or cross-cultural studies become possible. Otherwise, there is a lack of foundation to differentiate results that may reflect translation errors from those that reflect true differences between people on the variables being measured.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInstrument translation and evaluation of equivalence and psychometric properties: The Chinese sense of coherence scaleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTang, Siewen_US
dc.contributor.authorDixon, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsSiew Tang, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: sttang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Jane Dixonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163477-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Translating well-established English instruments into target languages other than English and testing cross-cultural validity to prove that the same attributes are being measured in each cultural group or country are necessary before a multicultural or international study can be conducted and cross-cultural comparisons of study results can be applied. However, rigorous and systematic cross-cultural efforts to test the effectiveness of specific translation methods are rare. Purpose of study: This study presents a model of translation processes and empirical validation of the translated instrument through description of the translation of a selected instrument--the Sense of Coherence (SOC) Scale (Antonovsky, 1987)-- from English into Chinese. Methods: Multiple methods were employed to ensure translation quality. A cyclic process of forward translations, back translations, and expert evaluation of equivalence by bilingual Chinese and English speaking experts was conducted to achieve conceptual equivalence between the original and translated instruments. For empirical validation of equivalence, data was obtained from bilingual Chinese people who completed both the 13-item Chinese SOC scale (C-SOC-13) and the comparable English SOC scale (E-SOC-13). Properties of the C-SOC-13 and the E-SOC-13 were compared. Statistical analysis: Translation validity index (TVI) -- a method similar to the computation of Content Validity Index -- was calculated for each item and also for the entire instrument from evaluations of experts. Additionally, the following statistical tests were conducted to evaluate equivalence between the E-SOC-13 and the C-SOC-13: (1) paired t-tests for comparing means of each item, subscale, and total scores; (2) intraclass correlation coefficients for assessing agreements of scores for each item; (3) Cronbach's alpha coefficients for internal consistency reliability; (4) item-total correlations and correlation equality tests for comparing corresponding item-total correlations and; (5) factor analyses for examining the underlying components. Results: After several rounds of assessment and modification of items based on the feedback of experts, the C-SOC-13 captured the essential concept of the E-SOC-13 as reflected by the satisfactory TVIs. Empirical validation of the Chinese SOC scale data demonstrated non-identical, but comparable, item and scale means and variances, internal consistency, item-total correlations, and factor structures. Implications: Only when systematic and scientific procedures are used to translate instruments and evidence of adequate translation is established by empirical validation, will international or cross-cultural studies become possible. Otherwise, there is a lack of foundation to differentiate results that may reflect translation errors from those that reflect true differences between people on the variables being measured.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:15Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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