Bypassing the middlemAN: EN02A grounded theory of women's self-care for vaginal symptoms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163479
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bypassing the middlemAN: EN02A grounded theory of women's self-care for vaginal symptoms
Author(s):
Theroux, Rosemary
Author Details:
Rosemary Theroux, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, Department of Nursing, Westford, Massachusetts, USA, email: Rosemary_Theroux@uml.edu
Abstract:
Problem: Vaginitis accounts for ten million visits annually. In 1991 vaginal antifungals were approved as over-the-counter (OTC) products, intended for use by women who had previously been diagnosed with a yeast infection by their health care provider. Studies have documented that from 33-73% of women use these products and home remedies as initial self-treatment for vaginal symptoms without consulting a health care provider. Deleterious outcomes of this behavior could include a delay in treatment or development of complications from an improperly treated condition. Since nurse practitioners care for women with vaginal conditions, both theory and research-based interventions are needed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the process of self-care of vaginal symptoms from the women's perspective, and to explore the decision-making process in self-treatment. Method: This qualitative study utilized a grounded theory design, in which theory is generated directly from the data. Data collection consisted of in-depth interviews with ten women who had used self-treatment and three pharmacists who had counseled women about OTC use. Text was analyzed using substantive and theoretical coding. Triangulation of data sources was accomplished by analysis of text from consumer literature and advertisements for vaginal OTC products. Findings: The basic problem experienced by the women was the need for rapid relief of symptoms. Because of many competing life demands, the women needed to resolve their problem in a way that was uncomplicated and involved minimal use of time and resources. In order to accomplish their goal, women used the four-stage process of Bypassing the Middleman. Some conditions that facilitated this process were low degree of uncertainty about cause of symptoms, judgment that the symptoms were low-risk and minor, feeling capable of solving the problem, perception that the time and effort to access the middleman (health care provider) were beyond her resources, a high priority for convenience, and the belief that self-treatment (non-drug) was safer than medical treatment. Environment (friends and family, culture, economics, popular literature, media) was the primary influence on women's knowledge and beliefs about vaginal conditions. Symptom characteristics, past experience, available resources, and beliefs about symptom management affected the process at every stage and explained the variance in self-care behaviors. Implications for Practice: This theory provides nurse practitioners with the ability to explain and predict which women will choose to use this process, and identifies controllable conditions for designing nursing interventions. Interventions should be on the individual, health care system, and environmental levels. This theory contributes to nursing knowledge development by adding to theory about self-care. A growing number of grounded theories on self-care could be combined to develop a grounded formal theory, or midrange theory for practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBypassing the middlemAN: EN02A grounded theory of women's self-care for vaginal symptomsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTheroux, Rosemaryen_US
dc.author.detailsRosemary Theroux, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, Department of Nursing, Westford, Massachusetts, USA, email: Rosemary_Theroux@uml.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163479-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Vaginitis accounts for ten million visits annually. In 1991 vaginal antifungals were approved as over-the-counter (OTC) products, intended for use by women who had previously been diagnosed with a yeast infection by their health care provider. Studies have documented that from 33-73% of women use these products and home remedies as initial self-treatment for vaginal symptoms without consulting a health care provider. Deleterious outcomes of this behavior could include a delay in treatment or development of complications from an improperly treated condition. Since nurse practitioners care for women with vaginal conditions, both theory and research-based interventions are needed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the process of self-care of vaginal symptoms from the women's perspective, and to explore the decision-making process in self-treatment. Method: This qualitative study utilized a grounded theory design, in which theory is generated directly from the data. Data collection consisted of in-depth interviews with ten women who had used self-treatment and three pharmacists who had counseled women about OTC use. Text was analyzed using substantive and theoretical coding. Triangulation of data sources was accomplished by analysis of text from consumer literature and advertisements for vaginal OTC products. Findings: The basic problem experienced by the women was the need for rapid relief of symptoms. Because of many competing life demands, the women needed to resolve their problem in a way that was uncomplicated and involved minimal use of time and resources. In order to accomplish their goal, women used the four-stage process of Bypassing the Middleman. Some conditions that facilitated this process were low degree of uncertainty about cause of symptoms, judgment that the symptoms were low-risk and minor, feeling capable of solving the problem, perception that the time and effort to access the middleman (health care provider) were beyond her resources, a high priority for convenience, and the belief that self-treatment (non-drug) was safer than medical treatment. Environment (friends and family, culture, economics, popular literature, media) was the primary influence on women's knowledge and beliefs about vaginal conditions. Symptom characteristics, past experience, available resources, and beliefs about symptom management affected the process at every stage and explained the variance in self-care behaviors. Implications for Practice: This theory provides nurse practitioners with the ability to explain and predict which women will choose to use this process, and identifies controllable conditions for designing nursing interventions. Interventions should be on the individual, health care system, and environmental levels. This theory contributes to nursing knowledge development by adding to theory about self-care. A growing number of grounded theories on self-care could be combined to develop a grounded formal theory, or midrange theory for practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:17Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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