2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163481
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparative study of IV venipuncture teaching methods
Author(s):
Underberg, Karin; Reck, Donna; Murray, Bosseau
Author Details:
Karin Underberg, Palmyra, Pennsylvania, USA, email: underberg.karin@tchden.org; Donna Reck; Bosseau Murray
Abstract:
Purpose: To assess the success of venipuncture performance and technique by evaluating the effectiveness of a new teaching modality, the CathSim(tm) (HT Medical Systems, Gaithersburg, MD) IV virtual reality simulator. This study is based on the multi-institutional study being conducted under the guidance of Virginia Barker, EdD, RN, at Plattsburgh State University, New York. Research Questions: Is there a difference in success rates of nurses who have trained with the CathSim(tm) compared to the traditional rubber arm? Is there a difference in confidence levels of nurses who have trained with the CathSim(tm) compared to the traditional rubber arm? Framework: The acquisition of clinical skills has traditionally relied on observation and practice followed by patient experience; however, innovations in technology using virtual reality-based simulators create opportunities for repeated practice with feedback on technique prior to the nurse's first patient encounter. Methods: All GN's (N=16) were randomly assigned to either a control group for traditional instruction or an experimental group using the CathSim(tm). Both groups completed a computer assisted instruction program on the IV venipuncture procedures. The control group then observed a videotape instructor demonstration of venipuncture in an IV model followed by practice using the artificial IV model. The experimental group practiced venipuncture using the CathSim(tm) using each of 5 case scenarios twice. Lastly, all participants performed IV venipunctures on volunteers. The insertion technique was videotaped and simultaneously observed by a qualified nurse rater. Nurse participants, volunteers and nurse raters completed a questionnaire based on the Plattsburgh State University model including measures of success, confidence and calmness. Two independent observers, the study co-investigators, reviewed the videotaped performances and completed a questionnaire. Results and Conclusions: Preliminary data were analyzed using median division ranking and then applying a Fisher's exact probability test. While there were no statistically significant differences on any of the outcome variables (success of insertion, confidence, calmness) for nurses, volunteers and nurse raters, it appeared that volunteers perceived the nurses in the experimental group to be more confident. Results indicate that more of the GN's using the traditional rubber arm felt confident 63% (7 out of 11) than those trained with CathSim(tm) 30 %(3 out of 10). Implications: Simulation learning is not a substitute for guidance from an expert practitioner; however, it provides repetition of tasks and familiarity with routines. Future research on simulation learning must include other sensitive outcomes such as psychomotor skills and human performance factors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparative study of IV venipuncture teaching methodsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUnderberg, Karinen_US
dc.contributor.authorReck, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Bosseauen_US
dc.author.detailsKarin Underberg, Palmyra, Pennsylvania, USA, email: underberg.karin@tchden.org; Donna Reck; Bosseau Murrayen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163481-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the success of venipuncture performance and technique by evaluating the effectiveness of a new teaching modality, the CathSim(tm) (HT Medical Systems, Gaithersburg, MD) IV virtual reality simulator. This study is based on the multi-institutional study being conducted under the guidance of Virginia Barker, EdD, RN, at Plattsburgh State University, New York. Research Questions: Is there a difference in success rates of nurses who have trained with the CathSim(tm) compared to the traditional rubber arm? Is there a difference in confidence levels of nurses who have trained with the CathSim(tm) compared to the traditional rubber arm? Framework: The acquisition of clinical skills has traditionally relied on observation and practice followed by patient experience; however, innovations in technology using virtual reality-based simulators create opportunities for repeated practice with feedback on technique prior to the nurse's first patient encounter. Methods: All GN's (N=16) were randomly assigned to either a control group for traditional instruction or an experimental group using the CathSim(tm). Both groups completed a computer assisted instruction program on the IV venipuncture procedures. The control group then observed a videotape instructor demonstration of venipuncture in an IV model followed by practice using the artificial IV model. The experimental group practiced venipuncture using the CathSim(tm) using each of 5 case scenarios twice. Lastly, all participants performed IV venipunctures on volunteers. The insertion technique was videotaped and simultaneously observed by a qualified nurse rater. Nurse participants, volunteers and nurse raters completed a questionnaire based on the Plattsburgh State University model including measures of success, confidence and calmness. Two independent observers, the study co-investigators, reviewed the videotaped performances and completed a questionnaire. Results and Conclusions: Preliminary data were analyzed using median division ranking and then applying a Fisher's exact probability test. While there were no statistically significant differences on any of the outcome variables (success of insertion, confidence, calmness) for nurses, volunteers and nurse raters, it appeared that volunteers perceived the nurses in the experimental group to be more confident. Results indicate that more of the GN's using the traditional rubber arm felt confident 63% (7 out of 11) than those trained with CathSim(tm) 30 %(3 out of 10). Implications: Simulation learning is not a substitute for guidance from an expert practitioner; however, it provides repetition of tasks and familiarity with routines. Future research on simulation learning must include other sensitive outcomes such as psychomotor skills and human performance factors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:19Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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