2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163489
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Responses and concerns of health care providers to medication errors
Author(s):
Wolf, Zane; Serembus, Joanne Farley
Author Details:
Zane Wolf, Dean & Professor, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wolf@lasalle.edu; Joanne Farley Serembus
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the responses and concerns of nurses, pharmacists, and physicians about making medication errors and to correlate such responses and concerns with estimated patient harm. Response is the reported emotional, social, and physical reaction of health care providers to making the medication error and concern is the worry and fear described by providers after the error. Patient harm is the estimated degree of severity for the patient following a medication error and an outcome of a medication error. Design: Descriptive, correlational study. Sample: Systematic random sample of health care professionals (N = 402) of nurses (n = 208), pharmacists (n = 112), and physicians (n = 82) was generated from a target population of health care professionals, obtained from a complete list of licensed physicians (N = 30,111), professional nurses (n = 161,387), and pharmacists (n = 12,582) provided by the State Board of Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy of the Bureau of Professional Affairs of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Method: The self-report survey used open-ended questions to elicit a description of the most serious drug error made by respondents. It included a checklist of interventions performed as a result of the drug error. Next, the National Coordinating Council's Medications Error Index (Hartwig, Denger, & Schneider, 1991) was used to determine the harm ranking of the error. A nine-point scale ranging from "0 = No Error, Circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause error" to "8 = Error, Death, An error occurred that resulted in patient death" evoked respondents' judgments. Also addressed are health care providers' responses to and concerns about the medication error. A six-point scale (0 = did not experience to 5 = definitely experienced) is used to elicit ranks on a listing of responses and concerns. Results and Conclusions: Respondents were guilty, nervous, and worried about the error. They feared for the safety of the patient, disciplinary action, and punishment. A few subjects indicated that they never reported the errors. The most frequent symptoms associated with errors were neurologically based. The injury suffered by patients was not severe overall according to the harm scales. Weak correlations were found for the harm scale and responses (r = 0.09, p = 0.14) and concerns (r = 0.12, p = 0.05). The responses (F = 4.75, df = 2,399, p =.009) and concerns (F =3.40, df = 2,399, p = 0.03) of nurses, physicians, and pharmacists differed significantly as demonstrated by ANOVA results. Scheffe post hoc tests indicated that nurses were guiltier, more worried, and more embarrassed than their counterparts. They also feared more for their patients, feared disciplinary action and punishment than the other health care providers. Nursing Implications: A supportive environment for health care providers following an error and continuous quality improvement efforts to eliminate system-based errors are suggested.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResponses and concerns of health care providers to medication errorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Zaneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSerembus, Joanne Farleyen_US
dc.author.detailsZane Wolf, Dean & Professor, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wolf@lasalle.edu; Joanne Farley Serembusen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163489-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the responses and concerns of nurses, pharmacists, and physicians about making medication errors and to correlate such responses and concerns with estimated patient harm. Response is the reported emotional, social, and physical reaction of health care providers to making the medication error and concern is the worry and fear described by providers after the error. Patient harm is the estimated degree of severity for the patient following a medication error and an outcome of a medication error. Design: Descriptive, correlational study. Sample: Systematic random sample of health care professionals (N = 402) of nurses (n = 208), pharmacists (n = 112), and physicians (n = 82) was generated from a target population of health care professionals, obtained from a complete list of licensed physicians (N = 30,111), professional nurses (n = 161,387), and pharmacists (n = 12,582) provided by the State Board of Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy of the Bureau of Professional Affairs of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Method: The self-report survey used open-ended questions to elicit a description of the most serious drug error made by respondents. It included a checklist of interventions performed as a result of the drug error. Next, the National Coordinating Council's Medications Error Index (Hartwig, Denger, & Schneider, 1991) was used to determine the harm ranking of the error. A nine-point scale ranging from "0 = No Error, Circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause error" to "8 = Error, Death, An error occurred that resulted in patient death" evoked respondents' judgments. Also addressed are health care providers' responses to and concerns about the medication error. A six-point scale (0 = did not experience to 5 = definitely experienced) is used to elicit ranks on a listing of responses and concerns. Results and Conclusions: Respondents were guilty, nervous, and worried about the error. They feared for the safety of the patient, disciplinary action, and punishment. A few subjects indicated that they never reported the errors. The most frequent symptoms associated with errors were neurologically based. The injury suffered by patients was not severe overall according to the harm scales. Weak correlations were found for the harm scale and responses (r = 0.09, p = 0.14) and concerns (r = 0.12, p = 0.05). The responses (F = 4.75, df = 2,399, p =.009) and concerns (F =3.40, df = 2,399, p = 0.03) of nurses, physicians, and pharmacists differed significantly as demonstrated by ANOVA results. Scheffe post hoc tests indicated that nurses were guiltier, more worried, and more embarrassed than their counterparts. They also feared more for their patients, feared disciplinary action and punishment than the other health care providers. Nursing Implications: A supportive environment for health care providers following an error and continuous quality improvement efforts to eliminate system-based errors are suggested.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:27Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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