Reported actions of supervisors and administrators following disclosure of medication errors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163490
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reported actions of supervisors and administrators following disclosure of medication errors
Author(s):
Wolf, Zane; Serembus, Joanne Farley
Author Details:
Zane Wolf, Dean & Professor, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wolf@lasalle.edu; Joanne Farley Serembus
Abstract:
A secondary analysis study examined the reported actions of supervisors and administrators following disclosure of medication errors made by health care providers. Data were obtained from the replies to open-ended items on a survey; the responses and concerns of nurses, pharmacists, and physicians about a medication error they judged as serious were identified. Descriptive statistics were calculated on subjects' responses addressing supervisors' or administrators' activities after medication errors. Textual data were isolated from respondents' (N = 402) answers on the instrument where supervisors' and administrators' actions following an error were detailed. Attending physicians and nurse managers or coordinators were notified of the drug error more often than pharmacists, resident physicians, directors of nursing, risk managers, clinical nurse specialists, or nurse practitioners. Superiors acted disapprovingly and aggressively toward the provider and interrogated them. A few physicians changed their story about the order, thus violating the trust of subjects. Subjects reported that they were reprimanded and humiliated. Mandatory re-education served to further humiliate health care providers. Superiors cautioned or warned them, instructed them about policies and procedures, discussed the incident formally and informally with them, or voiced their concern about the incident.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReported actions of supervisors and administrators following disclosure of medication errorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Zaneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSerembus, Joanne Farleyen_US
dc.author.detailsZane Wolf, Dean & Professor, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Ardmore, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wolf@lasalle.edu; Joanne Farley Serembusen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163490-
dc.description.abstractA secondary analysis study examined the reported actions of supervisors and administrators following disclosure of medication errors made by health care providers. Data were obtained from the replies to open-ended items on a survey; the responses and concerns of nurses, pharmacists, and physicians about a medication error they judged as serious were identified. Descriptive statistics were calculated on subjects' responses addressing supervisors' or administrators' activities after medication errors. Textual data were isolated from respondents' (N = 402) answers on the instrument where supervisors' and administrators' actions following an error were detailed. Attending physicians and nurse managers or coordinators were notified of the drug error more often than pharmacists, resident physicians, directors of nursing, risk managers, clinical nurse specialists, or nurse practitioners. Superiors acted disapprovingly and aggressively toward the provider and interrogated them. A few physicians changed their story about the order, thus violating the trust of subjects. Subjects reported that they were reprimanded and humiliated. Mandatory re-education served to further humiliate health care providers. Superiors cautioned or warned them, instructed them about policies and procedures, discussed the incident formally and informally with them, or voiced their concern about the incident.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:28Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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