2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163491
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal-fetal attachment: Descriptions by low income pregnant women
Author(s):
Zachariah, Rachel
Author Details:
Rachel Zachariah, Associate Professor, Northeastern University, School of Nursing, Norwood, Massachusetts, USA, email: r.zachariah@neu.edu
Abstract:
Bowlby (1977) has proposed that the earliest attachment relationship with ones mother is a prototype of future relationships in an individual's life. The nature of maternal-fetal attachment, needs to be clearly understood in determining its impact on the development of attachment and well-being of the mother-baby dyad. Leifer (1977) suggested that maternal-fetal attachment could be measured in light of the pregnant woman's affiliations and interactions toward her fetus. The instruments that measure the construct were developed from observations of middle income pregnant women. The purpose of the study was to describe the nature of maternal-fetal attachment using a qualitative approach. Forty-nine low income pregnant women, between 18 and 39 years of age and medically low risk, were asked to describe their feelings of love and emotional closeness to their developing fetus during early and late pregnancy. Content analysis was performed of the women's written responses. Responses both in early and late pregnancy generally indicated boundless, unconditional love mixed with a strong sense of intense anticipation and protectiveness toward the unborn child. Women also expressed mixed emotions, feelings of uncertainty, and feelings of pride. Few women did not express love, but simply felt that they knew the fetus as a special person. In other cases, the love was translated into a need to utilize healthy nutrition as a protective measure. In another case, the woman introduced a traumatic and negative vein, feeling she would kill anyone if her baby ever got hurt. Another contributed to the same vein by suggesting the pain that she would feel if she miscarries. Some related their love to the fetus to the love toward their previous child and towards the closeness between the woman and the unborn child's father 'created a being together', and the joy they share together. This supported Mercer (1986) who reported that positive mate relationships help to cement positive feelings about motherhood and the fetus. During late pregnancy, deep feelings of union at different levels were reported, particularly feeling connected to the fetus spiritually and emotionally. A number of respondents described a sensation of being one with the unborn child in stark contrast to one who felt it was too early to experience that type of maternal linkage as the baby just started to move. Another woman expressed caution and stayed detached, as she did not want to get hurt until the baby becomes a reality. One mother experienced a strong sense of attachment at the moment she felt the fetus move within her. Some ascribed a definite gender to the unborn, experiencing the sense of a separate person. All of the observations are supported in the literature. However, interactions with the fetus were not stated in the responses of these women as suggested by Leifer (1977).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal-fetal attachment: Descriptions by low income pregnant womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Rachelen_US
dc.author.detailsRachel Zachariah, Associate Professor, Northeastern University, School of Nursing, Norwood, Massachusetts, USA, email: r.zachariah@neu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163491-
dc.description.abstractBowlby (1977) has proposed that the earliest attachment relationship with ones mother is a prototype of future relationships in an individual's life. The nature of maternal-fetal attachment, needs to be clearly understood in determining its impact on the development of attachment and well-being of the mother-baby dyad. Leifer (1977) suggested that maternal-fetal attachment could be measured in light of the pregnant woman's affiliations and interactions toward her fetus. The instruments that measure the construct were developed from observations of middle income pregnant women. The purpose of the study was to describe the nature of maternal-fetal attachment using a qualitative approach. Forty-nine low income pregnant women, between 18 and 39 years of age and medically low risk, were asked to describe their feelings of love and emotional closeness to their developing fetus during early and late pregnancy. Content analysis was performed of the women's written responses. Responses both in early and late pregnancy generally indicated boundless, unconditional love mixed with a strong sense of intense anticipation and protectiveness toward the unborn child. Women also expressed mixed emotions, feelings of uncertainty, and feelings of pride. Few women did not express love, but simply felt that they knew the fetus as a special person. In other cases, the love was translated into a need to utilize healthy nutrition as a protective measure. In another case, the woman introduced a traumatic and negative vein, feeling she would kill anyone if her baby ever got hurt. Another contributed to the same vein by suggesting the pain that she would feel if she miscarries. Some related their love to the fetus to the love toward their previous child and towards the closeness between the woman and the unborn child's father 'created a being together', and the joy they share together. This supported Mercer (1986) who reported that positive mate relationships help to cement positive feelings about motherhood and the fetus. During late pregnancy, deep feelings of union at different levels were reported, particularly feeling connected to the fetus spiritually and emotionally. A number of respondents described a sensation of being one with the unborn child in stark contrast to one who felt it was too early to experience that type of maternal linkage as the baby just started to move. Another woman expressed caution and stayed detached, as she did not want to get hurt until the baby becomes a reality. One mother experienced a strong sense of attachment at the moment she felt the fetus move within her. Some ascribed a definite gender to the unborn, experiencing the sense of a separate person. All of the observations are supported in the literature. However, interactions with the fetus were not stated in the responses of these women as suggested by Leifer (1977).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:29Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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