2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163492
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An exercise intervention to prevent hepatitis - related fatigue
Author(s):
Zucker, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Zucker, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.edu
Abstract:
Purpose of the Study: The purpose of the proposed study will be to examine the relationship between completion of combination therapy, fatigue, an exercise intervention, quality of life (QOL), and walking distance in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Aims: Objectives of the proposed study are, among 20 patients with CHC about to begin combination therapy, a) to pilot test instruments measuring fatigue and QOL, b) to pilot test an exercise intervention, and c) to estimate the effect size of this intervention relative to completion of combination therapy, reduction of fatigue, increased QOL, and walking distance. Methods: 20 subjects will be recruited from gastroenterology practices in Massachusetts and Connecticut. A pretest posttest design will be used. Participants will be randomly assigned to either a group that will be getting the exercise intervention (EX) or a group receiving usual care (UC). Participants randomized to the EX group will begin an exercise intervention consisting of a self-paced walking program and support group activities. All study participants will have pre and post-test measures of fatigue, QOL, and walking distance at their local study site. To achieve the first objective, the instruments measuring fatigue (Schwartz Fatigue Scale) and quality of life (Hepatitis Quality of Life Questionnaire) will be evaluated for reliability using the test-retest method and Cronbach's alpha. To achieve the second objective, the feasibility of the procedure will be examined. To achieve the third objective, a power analysis program (G* Power) will be used to calculate the posttest effect sizes of reduction of fatigue, increased quality of life, increased walking distance and increased completion of treatment in the experimental and control groups. Results and Conclusions: This study was begun June, 2001. Implications for Nursing Practice: Although there is no proven cure for HCV, the only available treatment is combination therapy (combining two antiviral medications, interferon alpha-2b and ribavirin), for a 24 to 48 week course. Despite the availability of combination therapy, rates of treatment effectiveness are at about 40%. Management of side effects through an exercise intervention may promote completion of prescribed therapy and enhance rates of adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn exercise intervention to prevent hepatitis - related fatigueen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZucker, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Zucker, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163492-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of the Study: The purpose of the proposed study will be to examine the relationship between completion of combination therapy, fatigue, an exercise intervention, quality of life (QOL), and walking distance in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Aims: Objectives of the proposed study are, among 20 patients with CHC about to begin combination therapy, a) to pilot test instruments measuring fatigue and QOL, b) to pilot test an exercise intervention, and c) to estimate the effect size of this intervention relative to completion of combination therapy, reduction of fatigue, increased QOL, and walking distance. Methods: 20 subjects will be recruited from gastroenterology practices in Massachusetts and Connecticut. A pretest posttest design will be used. Participants will be randomly assigned to either a group that will be getting the exercise intervention (EX) or a group receiving usual care (UC). Participants randomized to the EX group will begin an exercise intervention consisting of a self-paced walking program and support group activities. All study participants will have pre and post-test measures of fatigue, QOL, and walking distance at their local study site. To achieve the first objective, the instruments measuring fatigue (Schwartz Fatigue Scale) and quality of life (Hepatitis Quality of Life Questionnaire) will be evaluated for reliability using the test-retest method and Cronbach's alpha. To achieve the second objective, the feasibility of the procedure will be examined. To achieve the third objective, a power analysis program (G* Power) will be used to calculate the posttest effect sizes of reduction of fatigue, increased quality of life, increased walking distance and increased completion of treatment in the experimental and control groups. Results and Conclusions: This study was begun June, 2001. Implications for Nursing Practice: Although there is no proven cure for HCV, the only available treatment is combination therapy (combining two antiviral medications, interferon alpha-2b and ribavirin), for a 24 to 48 week course. Despite the availability of combination therapy, rates of treatment effectiveness are at about 40%. Management of side effects through an exercise intervention may promote completion of prescribed therapy and enhance rates of adherence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:30Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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