2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163493
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adherence to treatment in women with Hepatitis C
Author(s):
Zucker, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Zucker, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.edu
Abstract:
Purpose of the study: The purpose of this study is to describe adherence to treatment in women with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Aims of current hepatitis research are focused on randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in efforts to achieve a sustained response from combination therapies using interferon and ribavirin. However, current efforts to enhance adherence in patients with CHC are not theoretically derived. Recently, concern has been raised over 1) patient adherence to the treatment regimen, and 2) sensitivity to special populations including minorities, women and children, and HIV co-infected patients. Empirical studies demonstrate that on average women comprise only 25% of most study samples, so less is known about women who have CHC. Aims: The specific aims of this study are to elicit 1) health beliefs of women with CHC, 2) how they identify and understand their health and illness states, and 3) their explanatory model of illness behavior, using focus groups. Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1974) and Social Learning Theory (Bandura 1986) will be used as theoretical foundations for this pilot study. Concepts such as explanatory models of illness (Kleinman, 1980) and illness behavior (Mechanic, 1962) will additionally serve to guide this study. Methods: A convenience sample of four focus groups of six women (24 women) will be recruited. Two groups will be recruited from regional hepatitis C support groups (adult normal population) and two groups from two local jails (incarcerated population). Participants for the adult normal group will be solicited by flyer distributed to support group members by support group leaders. They may use email or face-to-face methods of announcements of this study. Key informant nurse supervisors at two local jails will recruit incarcerated participants. They will post a flyer announcing the study opportunity and potential participants will be asked to sign up in the facility's nurse's office. Inclusion criteria include: women over age 21; diagnosis of CHC; English speaking; able to participate in a focus group. Exclusion criteria include active, debilitating, psychiatric illness. Results and Conclusions: The study is in progress. Implications for Nursing Practice: Current efforts to enhance adherence in patients with CHC are not theoretically derived. A transactional model of sorts will be considered for the purpose of this pilot to see if an interplay between The Health Belief Model and Social Learning Theory constructs in addition to illness behaviors and explanatory models may work together to influence an understanding of treatment adherence in women with CHC.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdherence to treatment in women with Hepatitis Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZucker, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Zucker, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, School of Nursing, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163493-
dc.description.abstractPurpose of the study: The purpose of this study is to describe adherence to treatment in women with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Aims of current hepatitis research are focused on randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in efforts to achieve a sustained response from combination therapies using interferon and ribavirin. However, current efforts to enhance adherence in patients with CHC are not theoretically derived. Recently, concern has been raised over 1) patient adherence to the treatment regimen, and 2) sensitivity to special populations including minorities, women and children, and HIV co-infected patients. Empirical studies demonstrate that on average women comprise only 25% of most study samples, so less is known about women who have CHC. Aims: The specific aims of this study are to elicit 1) health beliefs of women with CHC, 2) how they identify and understand their health and illness states, and 3) their explanatory model of illness behavior, using focus groups. Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model (Rosenstock, 1974) and Social Learning Theory (Bandura 1986) will be used as theoretical foundations for this pilot study. Concepts such as explanatory models of illness (Kleinman, 1980) and illness behavior (Mechanic, 1962) will additionally serve to guide this study. Methods: A convenience sample of four focus groups of six women (24 women) will be recruited. Two groups will be recruited from regional hepatitis C support groups (adult normal population) and two groups from two local jails (incarcerated population). Participants for the adult normal group will be solicited by flyer distributed to support group members by support group leaders. They may use email or face-to-face methods of announcements of this study. Key informant nurse supervisors at two local jails will recruit incarcerated participants. They will post a flyer announcing the study opportunity and potential participants will be asked to sign up in the facility's nurse's office. Inclusion criteria include: women over age 21; diagnosis of CHC; English speaking; able to participate in a focus group. Exclusion criteria include active, debilitating, psychiatric illness. Results and Conclusions: The study is in progress. Implications for Nursing Practice: Current efforts to enhance adherence in patients with CHC are not theoretically derived. A transactional model of sorts will be considered for the purpose of this pilot to see if an interplay between The Health Belief Model and Social Learning Theory constructs in addition to illness behaviors and explanatory models may work together to influence an understanding of treatment adherence in women with CHC.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:31Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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