2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163494
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living with a neobladder
Author(s):
Zuzelo, Patti; Beitz, Janice S.
Author Details:
Patti Zuzelo, Associate Professor, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Warminster, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zuzelo@lasalle.edu; Janice S. Beitz
Abstract:
Neobladder surgery is a new surgical innovation offering treatment for invasive bladder cancer while maintaining normal urinary sphincter function. The relevant literature predominately focuses on the physiologic effects or surgical outcomes of neobladder surgery with little attention given to the experiences of people undergoing the procedure. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the lived experience of having a neobladder. The research questions of this study are: What is the experience of living with a neobladder? What are the meanings and essences of the experience? The participants were contacted through two Clinical Nurse Specialists practicing with several large urological surgical services at two tertiary care centers. The participants were women (N=3) and men (N=11) diagnosed with bladder cancer who selected the creation of a neobladder as part of their treatment plan. The interviews, conducted in the homes of the participants, began with the open-ended question, "Please describe your experiences of living with a neobladder. You may begin with how your life experiences were before surgery, what your life experiences were during the surgical procedure, and what your life experience have been since the completion of the entire process. Please include anything that you think would help me to understand what it is like to be a person living with a neobladder." Prompters were used to obtain an exhaustive description of the lived experience. The interviews were audio-tape recorded and transcribed. The interviewing process was completed at the point of data saturation. The transcriptions were thematically analyzed using the strategies outlined by Colaizzi (1978). Themes were arranged beginning with the most significant experience from the perspective of the participants. Themes included: wanting to avoid the bag, dealing with urinary leaking, losing sexual functioning, training the new bladder, learning new bladder cues, finding clean bathroom facilities, and recognizing that life is precious. The participants experienced challenges related to urine leakage, particularly during the early months post-operatively. They discovered various strategies to maintain dryness including padding, scheduling urination, and recognizing antecedent behaviors that increased the likelihood of incontinence. The loss of manhood, experienced by the men secondarily to the prostatectomy associated with the neobladder procedure, was concerning and led to feelings of sadness and grief. They reminisced about their lost sexual ability and recognized that their spouses were also affected by their impotence. Although the men were aware of various sexual enhancements, pharmacologic or mechanical, they were generally dissatisfied with the options available to them. The participants found solace through formal and informal support groups. They appreciated the love of their family and friends and were keenly aware of the importance of this support. The study results suggest teaching and support strategies that may enhance the quality of care provided to patients considering neobladder surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
14th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
University Park, Pennsylvania, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving with a neobladderen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZuzelo, Pattien_US
dc.contributor.authorBeitz, Janice S.en_US
dc.author.detailsPatti Zuzelo, Associate Professor, LaSalle University, School of Nursing, Warminster, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zuzelo@lasalle.edu; Janice S. Beitzen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163494-
dc.description.abstractNeobladder surgery is a new surgical innovation offering treatment for invasive bladder cancer while maintaining normal urinary sphincter function. The relevant literature predominately focuses on the physiologic effects or surgical outcomes of neobladder surgery with little attention given to the experiences of people undergoing the procedure. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the lived experience of having a neobladder. The research questions of this study are: What is the experience of living with a neobladder? What are the meanings and essences of the experience? The participants were contacted through two Clinical Nurse Specialists practicing with several large urological surgical services at two tertiary care centers. The participants were women (N=3) and men (N=11) diagnosed with bladder cancer who selected the creation of a neobladder as part of their treatment plan. The interviews, conducted in the homes of the participants, began with the open-ended question, "Please describe your experiences of living with a neobladder. You may begin with how your life experiences were before surgery, what your life experiences were during the surgical procedure, and what your life experience have been since the completion of the entire process. Please include anything that you think would help me to understand what it is like to be a person living with a neobladder." Prompters were used to obtain an exhaustive description of the lived experience. The interviews were audio-tape recorded and transcribed. The interviewing process was completed at the point of data saturation. The transcriptions were thematically analyzed using the strategies outlined by Colaizzi (1978). Themes were arranged beginning with the most significant experience from the perspective of the participants. Themes included: wanting to avoid the bag, dealing with urinary leaking, losing sexual functioning, training the new bladder, learning new bladder cues, finding clean bathroom facilities, and recognizing that life is precious. The participants experienced challenges related to urine leakage, particularly during the early months post-operatively. They discovered various strategies to maintain dryness including padding, scheduling urination, and recognizing antecedent behaviors that increased the likelihood of incontinence. The loss of manhood, experienced by the men secondarily to the prostatectomy associated with the neobladder procedure, was concerning and led to feelings of sadness and grief. They reminisced about their lost sexual ability and recognized that their spouses were also affected by their impotence. Although the men were aware of various sexual enhancements, pharmacologic or mechanical, they were generally dissatisfied with the options available to them. The participants found solace through formal and informal support groups. They appreciated the love of their family and friends and were keenly aware of the importance of this support. The study results suggest teaching and support strategies that may enhance the quality of care provided to patients considering neobladder surgery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:32Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name14th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationUniversity Park, Pennsylvania, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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