2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163496
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Apolipoprotein E Genotype and Outcomes after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Author(s):
Alexander, Sheila; Kerr, Mary; Conley, Yvette P.; Kong, Yuan; Yonas, Howard
Author Details:
Sheila Alexander, BSN, PhD, Doctoral Candidate, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Acute and Tertiary Care, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: salexand@pitt.edu; Mary Kerr, RN, PhD; Yvette P. Conley, PhD; Yuan Kong, MS; Howard Yonas, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been associated with outcome after neurologic injury. The little research conducted on the relationship between APOE genotype and outcome in the subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains inconclusive. The purposes of this study were to describe the 1) APOE allele distribution in this SAH population and 2) relationship between APOE ?4 allele presence and clinical outcome following SAH. Methods: Data were analyzed from 87 subjects recruited as part of an on-going NIH funded study (#RO1NR04339). Inclusion criteria were: ages 18-75, diagnosis of severe aneurysmal SAH (Fisher grade ?2 or Hunt and Hess grade ?3). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from a drainage system for DNA extraction and APOE genotyping. The sample was dichotomized based on presence/absence of an APOE ?4 allele. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was assessed by telephone interview at 3, 6, and 12 months. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square analysis, and general equation estimation examined outcomes by APOE ?4 allele presence. Results: APOE genotypes were: 2/3 (n=7; 8%), 2/4 (n=1; 1.1%), 3/3 (n=59; 67.8%), and 3/4 (n=20; 23). Trends suggested the APOE ?4 allele was associated with lower admission Hunt and Hess scores (?2=7.87; p=.096) but not associated with Fisher grade. Presence of an APOE ?4 allele (p=.0195) and a lower Hunt and Hess (p< .001), was associated with a higher probability of a good outcome after controlling for age, gender, race, time from injury, and fisher grade. Conclusions and Implications: In that these subjects had a less severe hemorrhage, the APOE ?4 allele may have an indirect association with improved outcomes. Ability to identify individuals at risk for poor outcome after SAH will enable nurses and other health care professionals to design individualized interventions to maximize recovery and focus resource utilization on individuals at the greatest risk.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApolipoprotein E Genotype and Outcomes after Subarachnoid Hemorrhageen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorConley, Yvette P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKong, Yuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorYonas, Howarden_US
dc.author.detailsSheila Alexander, BSN, PhD, Doctoral Candidate, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Acute and Tertiary Care, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: salexand@pitt.edu; Mary Kerr, RN, PhD; Yvette P. Conley, PhD; Yuan Kong, MS; Howard Yonas, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163496-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been associated with outcome after neurologic injury. The little research conducted on the relationship between APOE genotype and outcome in the subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains inconclusive. The purposes of this study were to describe the 1) APOE allele distribution in this SAH population and 2) relationship between APOE ?4 allele presence and clinical outcome following SAH. Methods: Data were analyzed from 87 subjects recruited as part of an on-going NIH funded study (#RO1NR04339). Inclusion criteria were: ages 18-75, diagnosis of severe aneurysmal SAH (Fisher grade ?2 or Hunt and Hess grade ?3). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from a drainage system for DNA extraction and APOE genotyping. The sample was dichotomized based on presence/absence of an APOE ?4 allele. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was assessed by telephone interview at 3, 6, and 12 months. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square analysis, and general equation estimation examined outcomes by APOE ?4 allele presence. Results: APOE genotypes were: 2/3 (n=7; 8%), 2/4 (n=1; 1.1%), 3/3 (n=59; 67.8%), and 3/4 (n=20; 23). Trends suggested the APOE ?4 allele was associated with lower admission Hunt and Hess scores (?2=7.87; p=.096) but not associated with Fisher grade. Presence of an APOE ?4 allele (p=.0195) and a lower Hunt and Hess (p< .001), was associated with a higher probability of a good outcome after controlling for age, gender, race, time from injury, and fisher grade. Conclusions and Implications: In that these subjects had a less severe hemorrhage, the APOE ?4 allele may have an indirect association with improved outcomes. Ability to identify individuals at risk for poor outcome after SAH will enable nurses and other health care professionals to design individualized interventions to maximize recovery and focus resource utilization on individuals at the greatest risk.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:34Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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