2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163497
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated with Glucose Control in Black Women with Type 2 Diabetes
Author(s):
Amend, Allison; Langerman, Susan; Galasso, Pamela; Jefferson, Vanessa; Chyun, Deborah; Melkus, Gail
Author Details:
Allison Amend, RN, MSN, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Allison.Amend@Yale.edu; Susan Langerman, RN, MSN; Pamela Galasso, RD, BS; Vanessa Jefferson, RN, MSN; Deborah Chyun, RN, PhD; Gail Melkus, RN, EdD
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this baseline analysis of women in the Self-management Intervention for Black Women with T2DM Study was to determine if psychosocial factors and quality of life (QOL) were associated with poor glucose control. Methods: Questionnaires assessing emotional distress (Problem Areas in Diabetes - PAID), somatic anxiety (Crown-Crisp Index), self-care efficacy (SE-Q), provider support for diet and exercise, and QOL (Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form-36 û SF-36), were administered to105 women prior to randomization; blood samples for HbA1c were also obtained. T-tests determined the association of each factor with HbA1c levels, dichotomized at a 10th percentile cut point of 10.9% to define poor glucose control. Results: Average age was 48.4¦ 9.3 years; mean HbA1c was 8.1¦ 2.2%. Most (66%) were living alone and employed full or part-time (66%); 36% had completed college, 41% had incomes of < $10,000/year. One-quarter had a HbA1c > 9.8%. Poorer control was significantly associated with higher emotional distress (p = .003), lower levels of perceived provider support for diet (p = .007) and exercise (p = .01), higher levels of somatic anxiety (p = .03), and poorer QOL in all 8 SF-36 domains: physical function (p = .03), role-physical (p = .009), bodily pain (p = .02), general health (p = .002), vitality (p = .0008), social function (p = .05), role-emotional (p = .009), mental health (p = .002). Higher HbA1c levels were not associated with SE-Q scores. Conclusions and Implications: Limited by the cross-sectional nature of the study and the inability to determine causality, emotional distress and somatic anxiety were strongly associated with poorer glucose control, and QOL was severely diminished in women with poor control. Provider support may contribute to improvements in control. Importantly, in this cohort of young women, glucose control was frequently suboptimal, placing them at high risk for diabetes-related complications.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated with Glucose Control in Black Women with Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAmend, Allisonen_US
dc.contributor.authorLangerman, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorGalasso, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJefferson, Vanessaen_US
dc.contributor.authorChyun, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelkus, Gailen_US
dc.author.detailsAllison Amend, RN, MSN, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: Allison.Amend@Yale.edu; Susan Langerman, RN, MSN; Pamela Galasso, RD, BS; Vanessa Jefferson, RN, MSN; Deborah Chyun, RN, PhD; Gail Melkus, RN, EdDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163497-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this baseline analysis of women in the Self-management Intervention for Black Women with T2DM Study was to determine if psychosocial factors and quality of life (QOL) were associated with poor glucose control. Methods: Questionnaires assessing emotional distress (Problem Areas in Diabetes - PAID), somatic anxiety (Crown-Crisp Index), self-care efficacy (SE-Q), provider support for diet and exercise, and QOL (Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form-36 &ucirc; SF-36), were administered to105 women prior to randomization; blood samples for HbA1c were also obtained. T-tests determined the association of each factor with HbA1c levels, dichotomized at a 10th percentile cut point of 10.9% to define poor glucose control. Results: Average age was 48.4&brvbar; 9.3 years; mean HbA1c was 8.1&brvbar; 2.2%. Most (66%) were living alone and employed full or part-time (66%); 36% had completed college, 41% had incomes of < $10,000/year. One-quarter had a HbA1c > 9.8%. Poorer control was significantly associated with higher emotional distress (p = .003), lower levels of perceived provider support for diet (p = .007) and exercise (p = .01), higher levels of somatic anxiety (p = .03), and poorer QOL in all 8 SF-36 domains: physical function (p = .03), role-physical (p = .009), bodily pain (p = .02), general health (p = .002), vitality (p = .0008), social function (p = .05), role-emotional (p = .009), mental health (p = .002). Higher HbA1c levels were not associated with SE-Q scores. Conclusions and Implications: Limited by the cross-sectional nature of the study and the inability to determine causality, emotional distress and somatic anxiety were strongly associated with poorer glucose control, and QOL was severely diminished in women with poor control. Provider support may contribute to improvements in control. Importantly, in this cohort of young women, glucose control was frequently suboptimal, placing them at high risk for diabetes-related complications.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:35Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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