The Economic Burden of Healthcare Associated Infections: A Systematic Review of Economic Evidence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163503
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Economic Burden of Healthcare Associated Infections: A Systematic Review of Economic Evidence
Author(s):
Braccia, Deborah; Stone, Patricia W.; Larson, Elaine
Author Details:
Deborah Braccia, RN, MPA, OCN, Student, Columbia University School of Nursing, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, email: db2154@columbia.edu; Patricia W. Stone, PhD, MPH, MS; Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, FAAN, CIC
Abstract:
Purpose: Healthcare associated infections (HAI), with the incidence in the US estimated to be approximately 2 million cases annually, are a serious patient safety issue. It is critically important to understand both the economic burden of HAI as well as the cost-effectiveness research evidence examining health-related technologies, services, and programs aimed at reducing HAI disease-related morbidity and mortality. The specific objectives of this research were to systematically assess the evidence base available on the economic impact of HAIs infections and interventions aimed at reducing the burden of HAI; and, identify the types of HAIs being analyzed and the economic methods employed including the quality of these analyses.Methods: A systematic review of existing published evidence was conducted. Databases searched included Medline, EconoLit and CINHAL. Studies were eligible if they were written in English, published after 2000 and had an original estimate of the cost HAI or an intervention to reduce HAI incidence or morbidity. An audit form containing 23 different data elements, including the type of study (burden of illness or economic evaluation of intervention), source of funding, country of study, HAI analyzed, use of the CDC definitions, and consideration of antibiotic resistance, was developed. Two readers audited each study. All data were entered into an ACCESS database and analyzed using SPSS. Descriptive statistics were computed. Results: Seventy studies were eligible. Demographic data on the studies included: 56% were conducted in the US; source of funding was not stated in 61%; most common HAI analyzed were surgical (26%), blood stream (20%), pneumonia (9%); antibiotic resistance was studied in 30%; 41% used the CDC definition of HAI; 57% examined cost of HAI, while 43% examined intervention; and, 50% were rated as being of high quality. The cost data of the studies was not easily comparable due to the different denominators. Conclusions: HAI continues to be an increasingly important issue that affects practice and policy. Additional work needs to be done to standardize the methods and quality of economic studies, so that comparisons can be made between studies and interventions when making decisions regarding HAI outcomes, clinical practice and healthcare policy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Economic Burden of Healthcare Associated Infections: A Systematic Review of Economic Evidenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBraccia, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Patricia W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Elaineen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Braccia, RN, MPA, OCN, Student, Columbia University School of Nursing, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, email: db2154@columbia.edu; Patricia W. Stone, PhD, MPH, MS; Elaine Larson, RN, PhD, FAAN, CICen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163503-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Healthcare associated infections (HAI), with the incidence in the US estimated to be approximately 2 million cases annually, are a serious patient safety issue. It is critically important to understand both the economic burden of HAI as well as the cost-effectiveness research evidence examining health-related technologies, services, and programs aimed at reducing HAI disease-related morbidity and mortality. The specific objectives of this research were to systematically assess the evidence base available on the economic impact of HAIs infections and interventions aimed at reducing the burden of HAI; and, identify the types of HAIs being analyzed and the economic methods employed including the quality of these analyses.Methods: A systematic review of existing published evidence was conducted. Databases searched included Medline, EconoLit and CINHAL. Studies were eligible if they were written in English, published after 2000 and had an original estimate of the cost HAI or an intervention to reduce HAI incidence or morbidity. An audit form containing 23 different data elements, including the type of study (burden of illness or economic evaluation of intervention), source of funding, country of study, HAI analyzed, use of the CDC definitions, and consideration of antibiotic resistance, was developed. Two readers audited each study. All data were entered into an ACCESS database and analyzed using SPSS. Descriptive statistics were computed. Results: Seventy studies were eligible. Demographic data on the studies included: 56% were conducted in the US; source of funding was not stated in 61%; most common HAI analyzed were surgical (26%), blood stream (20%), pneumonia (9%); antibiotic resistance was studied in 30%; 41% used the CDC definition of HAI; 57% examined cost of HAI, while 43% examined intervention; and, 50% were rated as being of high quality. The cost data of the studies was not easily comparable due to the different denominators. Conclusions: HAI continues to be an increasingly important issue that affects practice and policy. Additional work needs to be done to standardize the methods and quality of economic studies, so that comparisons can be made between studies and interventions when making decisions regarding HAI outcomes, clinical practice and healthcare policy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:41Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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