Measuring Nicotine Dependence among Pregnant Adolescent Smokers: Does race matter?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163504
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Nicotine Dependence among Pregnant Adolescent Smokers: Does race matter?
Author(s):
Braxter, Betty
Author Details:
Betty Braxter, RN, PhD, FAAN, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: bjbst32@pitt.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Prenatal smoking remains a major public health problem associated with a number of adverse outcomes (e.g., low birth weight) Adolescents have the highest rate of prenatal smoking compared to other age groups of women with distinct racial differences in smoking behaviors and patterns well documented. One factor critical in the maintenance of smoking behaviors and failure to quit is nicotine dependence (CDC, 2000). Little is known, however, about the reliability of one widely used measure of nicotine dependence, the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) (Heatherton, Kozlowski, Frecker, & Fagerstr÷m, 1991), among African American and Caucasian pregnant adolescent smokers. Aims. The primary aims of this study were to 1.) describe the smoking behaviors and patterns in African American and Caucasian pregnant adolescent smokers, and 2) assess the reliability of the FTND in the two racial groups of smokers. Methods: The study employed a descriptive design with a sample of 92 African American and 91 Caucasian pregnant adolescent smoker's age 14-19 years. Data were drawn from three self report measures. Results: African Americans smoked fewer cigarettes per day than their Caucasian counterparts [ 5.7 (S.D. 3) vs. 7.6 (S.D. 5]. The mean difference was significant (Student-t [170], 2.83, p < .01). More African Americans than Caucasians were classified as experiencing low dependence; more Caucasians than African Americans were classified as experiencing moderate to high dependence (?2 [3],16.28, p=.003). Alpha coefficients were 0.26 in the African American sample compared to 0.55 in the Caucasian sample. Both coefficients were well below minimum standards suggested for research instruments. Conclusions/Implications: Racial differences in smoking behaviors and patterns impacted the measurement of nicotine dependence. The FTND was found to have poor internal consistency for both racial groups. Future studies are needed to examine the reliability of the FTND in varied racial groups of pregnant adolescent smokers
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Nicotine Dependence among Pregnant Adolescent Smokers: Does race matter?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBraxter, Bettyen_US
dc.author.detailsBetty Braxter, RN, PhD, FAAN, Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: bjbst32@pitt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163504-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Prenatal smoking remains a major public health problem associated with a number of adverse outcomes (e.g., low birth weight) Adolescents have the highest rate of prenatal smoking compared to other age groups of women with distinct racial differences in smoking behaviors and patterns well documented. One factor critical in the maintenance of smoking behaviors and failure to quit is nicotine dependence (CDC, 2000). Little is known, however, about the reliability of one widely used measure of nicotine dependence, the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) (Heatherton, Kozlowski, Frecker, & Fagerstr&divide;m, 1991), among African American and Caucasian pregnant adolescent smokers. Aims. The primary aims of this study were to 1.) describe the smoking behaviors and patterns in African American and Caucasian pregnant adolescent smokers, and 2) assess the reliability of the FTND in the two racial groups of smokers. Methods: The study employed a descriptive design with a sample of 92 African American and 91 Caucasian pregnant adolescent smoker's age 14-19 years. Data were drawn from three self report measures. Results: African Americans smoked fewer cigarettes per day than their Caucasian counterparts [ 5.7 (S.D. 3) vs. 7.6 (S.D. 5]. The mean difference was significant (Student-t [170], 2.83, p < .01). More African Americans than Caucasians were classified as experiencing low dependence; more Caucasians than African Americans were classified as experiencing moderate to high dependence (?2 [3],16.28, p=.003). Alpha coefficients were 0.26 in the African American sample compared to 0.55 in the Caucasian sample. Both coefficients were well below minimum standards suggested for research instruments. Conclusions/Implications: Racial differences in smoking behaviors and patterns impacted the measurement of nicotine dependence. The FTND was found to have poor internal consistency for both racial groups. Future studies are needed to examine the reliability of the FTND in varied racial groups of pregnant adolescent smokersen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:42Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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