2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163505
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
APRN Supply and Demand in a Small Rural State
Author(s):
Buck-Rolland, Carol; Palumbo, Mary Val
Author Details:
Carol Buck-Rolland, MSN, APRN, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Vermont, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: Carol.buck-rolland@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, ND, APRN
Abstract:
Purpose: An investigation of supply and demand for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses was conducted in a small rural state for the purpose of educational planning and health workforce resource assessment. Methods: A relicensure survey of 353 advanced practice nurses (83 % of all Vermont APRN's) was completed in March, 2003. Data were collected on demographic, practice setting, primary activity, job satisfaction, intention to leave, in order to measure supply of APRN's. At the same time data from Vermont hospitals (15/16), home health agencies (11/12), nursing homes (26/44) and primary care offices (141/252) was collected with the Health Workforce Assessment Pilot Survey. This study is a secondary analysis of the two surveys to examine both supply and demand of Vermont APRN's in March 2003. results: The mean age for APRN's in Vermont is 48.5 years, with 89% being female. The majority (61 %) work in rural settings of < 100 people per square mile. The majority work in direct patient care (69%) with an average of between 35-42 hours per week. Being very satisfied with their current position was reported by 68%, with an additional 28% somewhat satisfied, and 70% reported being very unlikely to leave their current position. The perceived need for APRN in hospital settings was equal to the budgeted positions for NP, CNM, and NA, and greater than budgeted positions for CNS in three hospitals. Vacancy rate in NP office practice is 5% with a turnover rate of 8%. Conclusions and Implications: The supply survey demonstrated a stable, very satisfied APRN workforce in Vermont, with the vast majority of providers involved in direct patient care in rural settings. Although low vacancy/turnover rates were reported in the demand survey, there are implications of long term workforce issues with the average APRN age of 48.5 years and retirement age rapidly approaching.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAPRN Supply and Demand in a Small Rural Stateen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuck-Rolland, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Mary Valen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Buck-Rolland, MSN, APRN, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Vermont, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: Carol.buck-rolland@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, ND, APRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163505-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: An investigation of supply and demand for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses was conducted in a small rural state for the purpose of educational planning and health workforce resource assessment. Methods: A relicensure survey of 353 advanced practice nurses (83 % of all Vermont APRN's) was completed in March, 2003. Data were collected on demographic, practice setting, primary activity, job satisfaction, intention to leave, in order to measure supply of APRN's. At the same time data from Vermont hospitals (15/16), home health agencies (11/12), nursing homes (26/44) and primary care offices (141/252) was collected with the Health Workforce Assessment Pilot Survey. This study is a secondary analysis of the two surveys to examine both supply and demand of Vermont APRN's in March 2003. results: The mean age for APRN's in Vermont is 48.5 years, with 89% being female. The majority (61 %) work in rural settings of < 100 people per square mile. The majority work in direct patient care (69%) with an average of between 35-42 hours per week. Being very satisfied with their current position was reported by 68%, with an additional 28% somewhat satisfied, and 70% reported being very unlikely to leave their current position. The perceived need for APRN in hospital settings was equal to the budgeted positions for NP, CNM, and NA, and greater than budgeted positions for CNS in three hospitals. Vacancy rate in NP office practice is 5% with a turnover rate of 8%. Conclusions and Implications: The supply survey demonstrated a stable, very satisfied APRN workforce in Vermont, with the vast majority of providers involved in direct patient care in rural settings. Although low vacancy/turnover rates were reported in the demand survey, there are implications of long term workforce issues with the average APRN age of 48.5 years and retirement age rapidly approaching.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:43Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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