2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163508
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healthy Habits in Recovery
Author(s):
Christensen, Margaret; Amaro, Hortensia; Nieves, Rita
Author Details:
Margaret Christensen, Margaret, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: m.christensen@neu.edu; Ellen Glovsky, RN, PhD; Hortensia Amaro, PhD; Rita Nieves, MPH, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Women in recovery from substance abuse often neglect their health as they focus on multiple changes required to be successful at staying sober. Residential recovery programs serving lower socioeconomic classes often lack health promotion activities, but it is not clear if this is due to lack of resources or lack of interest. The aim of this study was to determine the level of interest in healthy eating, increased physical activity, and smoking cessation among women of color living in inner-city recovery residences. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with women living in economically disadvantaged recovery residences; one group of English speaking Latina women (n=20), one group of Spanish speaking Latina women (n=14), and one group of African American women (n=18). The groups were conducted by a bi-lingual cultural expert in group processes. Each group was asked the same questions. Discussions were taped and transcribed. Themes were determined by three experts in health promotion/addiction. Results: All groups were very interested in improving their nutrition and exercise practices, but smoking cessation was not a priority. The need to change behaviors related to all aspects of food preparation and consumption was recognized, but the underlying addiction experience adds complexity to this proposal. Physical activity was perceived as highly desirable and residents developed creative ideas on this subject. Conclusions and Implications: Health promotion is perceived as desirable and achievable in underprivileged women in recovery. By utilizing a grass-roots approach to understanding issues related to health behaviors, interventions can be planned and implemented that are culturally relevant and add to the therapeutic milieu of recovery programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealthy Habits in Recoveryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorAmaro, Hortensiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNieves, Ritaen_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Christensen, Margaret, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: m.christensen@neu.edu; Ellen Glovsky, RN, PhD; Hortensia Amaro, PhD; Rita Nieves, MPH, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163508-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Women in recovery from substance abuse often neglect their health as they focus on multiple changes required to be successful at staying sober. Residential recovery programs serving lower socioeconomic classes often lack health promotion activities, but it is not clear if this is due to lack of resources or lack of interest. The aim of this study was to determine the level of interest in healthy eating, increased physical activity, and smoking cessation among women of color living in inner-city recovery residences. Methods: Three focus groups were conducted with women living in economically disadvantaged recovery residences; one group of English speaking Latina women (n=20), one group of Spanish speaking Latina women (n=14), and one group of African American women (n=18). The groups were conducted by a bi-lingual cultural expert in group processes. Each group was asked the same questions. Discussions were taped and transcribed. Themes were determined by three experts in health promotion/addiction. Results: All groups were very interested in improving their nutrition and exercise practices, but smoking cessation was not a priority. The need to change behaviors related to all aspects of food preparation and consumption was recognized, but the underlying addiction experience adds complexity to this proposal. Physical activity was perceived as highly desirable and residents developed creative ideas on this subject. Conclusions and Implications: Health promotion is perceived as desirable and achievable in underprivileged women in recovery. By utilizing a grass-roots approach to understanding issues related to health behaviors, interventions can be planned and implemented that are culturally relevant and add to the therapeutic milieu of recovery programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:46Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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