2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163509
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Economic Burden of Congenital Heart Disease
Author(s):
Connor, Jean; Kline, Nancy; Mott, Sandra; Jenkins, Kathy J.
Author Details:
Jean Connor, DNSc, RN, CPNP, Children's Hospital of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Jean.connor@cardio.chboston.org; Nancy Kline PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN; Sandra Mott PhD, RN; Kathy J. Jenkins MD, MPH
Abstract:
Purpose: The economic burden of pediatric illness and its social impact on families has not been described as it relates to congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to describe the economic burden of CHD as experienced by families. Methods: An exploratory inquiry using semi-structured interviews was conducted. A purposive sampling technique was used to identify parents of children, (1 day to 5 years), with various degrees of CHD complexity and Socioeconomic status (SES) admitted for congenital heart surgery at a large tertiary care center. Complexity of CHD was approximated using the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery Method (RACHS-1). SES was estimated using the Hollingshead Four Factor Index Scale. Structured interviews guided by 6 questions focusing on the meaning of cost as experienced by the individuals and the impact on social functioning on the family were conducted. Interviews lasted 1 hour. All interviews were audiotaped and then transcribed verbatim. Data were numbered, sorted and coded using NVivo software. Three researchers independently examined the data to identify thematic categories. Inter-rater reliability was 91%. Results: Of the 20 interviews, two major themes emerged; uncertainty and lifestyle change. Data were further sorted into three underlying categories; financial, emotional, and family burden. As a result of increased disease complexity, families seemed to experience a high level of stress in terms of finances, emotional drain and family member burden. Families who received diagnosis during the prenatal period verbalized economic burden as an early stressor and altered personal spending prior to the birth of the infant. Perception of the economic impact of the child's condition was dependent on baseline SES. Conclusions and Implications: Although the complexity of disease seemed to increase economic burden, the timing of diagnosis and baseline socioeconomic status were also noted to contribute to economic stress. Targeted interventions aimed at decreasing economic burden may enhance family adjustment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEconomic Burden of Congenital Heart Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnor, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKline, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMott, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Kathy J.en_US
dc.author.detailsJean Connor, DNSc, RN, CPNP, Children's Hospital of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Jean.connor@cardio.chboston.org; Nancy Kline PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN; Sandra Mott PhD, RN; Kathy J. Jenkins MD, MPHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163509-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The economic burden of pediatric illness and its social impact on families has not been described as it relates to congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to describe the economic burden of CHD as experienced by families. Methods: An exploratory inquiry using semi-structured interviews was conducted. A purposive sampling technique was used to identify parents of children, (1 day to 5 years), with various degrees of CHD complexity and Socioeconomic status (SES) admitted for congenital heart surgery at a large tertiary care center. Complexity of CHD was approximated using the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery Method (RACHS-1). SES was estimated using the Hollingshead Four Factor Index Scale. Structured interviews guided by 6 questions focusing on the meaning of cost as experienced by the individuals and the impact on social functioning on the family were conducted. Interviews lasted 1 hour. All interviews were audiotaped and then transcribed verbatim. Data were numbered, sorted and coded using NVivo software. Three researchers independently examined the data to identify thematic categories. Inter-rater reliability was 91%. Results: Of the 20 interviews, two major themes emerged; uncertainty and lifestyle change. Data were further sorted into three underlying categories; financial, emotional, and family burden. As a result of increased disease complexity, families seemed to experience a high level of stress in terms of finances, emotional drain and family member burden. Families who received diagnosis during the prenatal period verbalized economic burden as an early stressor and altered personal spending prior to the birth of the infant. Perception of the economic impact of the child's condition was dependent on baseline SES. Conclusions and Implications: Although the complexity of disease seemed to increase economic burden, the timing of diagnosis and baseline socioeconomic status were also noted to contribute to economic stress. Targeted interventions aimed at decreasing economic burden may enhance family adjustment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:47Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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