Environmental and Human Interactions in a WIC Clinic that Influence Infant Feeding Decisions of Black Women.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163512
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Environmental and Human Interactions in a WIC Clinic that Influence Infant Feeding Decisions of Black Women.
Author(s):
Cricco-Lizza, Roberta
Author Details:
Roberta Cricco-Lizza, RN PhD, MPH, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Towaco, New Jersey, USA, email: rcricco@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Breastfeeding initiation and duration rates do not meet Healthy People 2010 goals and reflect disparities along racial and income lines. The lowest breastfeeding rates in the United States are found among women who are enrolled in WIC. Low income, Black women have the lowest breastfeeding rates. This ethnographic study explores WIC influence on Black women's infant feeding decisions in a New York metropolitan area WIC clinic. Methods: Interviewing and participant observation were conducted over an 18-month period on an inner city population, which included 319 people (130 Black women enrolled in WIC (BWEW), 189 relatives and friends) with close follow-up of 11 primiparous key informants during pregnancy and the first postpartal year. Field notes and transcriptions of audio taped interviews were coded and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes. NUD*IST aided data management and analysis. The findings were verified through the procedures of triangulation, member checking, peer review and prolonged engagement. Findings: The major themes that emerged from analysis include: 1.The WIC clinic environment set a positive tone for service. 2. WIC Employees treated the women with caring and respect. 3. BWEW believed that WIC was a source of support in time of need. 4. WIC influenced infant feeding decisions. The availability of free formula facilitated bottle feeding but personalized breastfeeding promotion with trusting relationships with WIC providers encouraged breastfeeding decisions for almost half of the key informants. Conclusions and Implications: This research provides detailed descriptions of environmental and human interactions that influence infant feeding decisions. A trusting relationship with and support from health care professionals were found to powerfully influence these decisions. These findings could be used to provide culturally sensitive care for BWEW.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnvironmental and Human Interactions in a WIC Clinic that Influence Infant Feeding Decisions of Black Women.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCricco-Lizza, Robertaen_US
dc.author.detailsRoberta Cricco-Lizza, RN PhD, MPH, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Towaco, New Jersey, USA, email: rcricco@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163512-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Breastfeeding initiation and duration rates do not meet Healthy People 2010 goals and reflect disparities along racial and income lines. The lowest breastfeeding rates in the United States are found among women who are enrolled in WIC. Low income, Black women have the lowest breastfeeding rates. This ethnographic study explores WIC influence on Black women's infant feeding decisions in a New York metropolitan area WIC clinic. Methods: Interviewing and participant observation were conducted over an 18-month period on an inner city population, which included 319 people (130 Black women enrolled in WIC (BWEW), 189 relatives and friends) with close follow-up of 11 primiparous key informants during pregnancy and the first postpartal year. Field notes and transcriptions of audio taped interviews were coded and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes. NUD*IST aided data management and analysis. The findings were verified through the procedures of triangulation, member checking, peer review and prolonged engagement. Findings: The major themes that emerged from analysis include: 1.The WIC clinic environment set a positive tone for service. 2. WIC Employees treated the women with caring and respect. 3. BWEW believed that WIC was a source of support in time of need. 4. WIC influenced infant feeding decisions. The availability of free formula facilitated bottle feeding but personalized breastfeeding promotion with trusting relationships with WIC providers encouraged breastfeeding decisions for almost half of the key informants. Conclusions and Implications: This research provides detailed descriptions of environmental and human interactions that influence infant feeding decisions. A trusting relationship with and support from health care professionals were found to powerfully influence these decisions. These findings could be used to provide culturally sensitive care for BWEW.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:50Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.