2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163513
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Order of Data Collection Matter?
Author(s):
Deshefy-Longhi, Terry; Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Karpe Dixon, Jane
Author Details:
Terry Deshefy-Longhi, RN, MSN, Doctoral Student, Yale University School of Nursing, Hamden, Connecticut, USA, email: terry.deshefy-longhi@yale.edu; Susan Sullivan-Bolyai, DNSc, CNS, RN; Jane Karpe Dixon, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: Although the debate about the appropriate uses of a mixed methods approach continues, many researchers are, in fact, readily adopting such a combined approach. Caution must be employed, however, in considering the effect of combining these two approaches on the validity of the data collected. Specifically, a researcher must give careful thought to the order in which the qualitative and quantitative data are to be collected so that one method does not alter or bias the responses to the other method. The purpose of this paper is to explore how order of data collection is determined in mixed methods studies and to provide recommendations for researchers in determining order of data collection. Method: A review of the literature from published works from 1997 was conducted to understand current practices, investigate possible threats to internal validity due to data collection sequencing, and provide recommendations for researchers. Mixed methods studies were categorized according to sequencing of the qualitative and quantitative components, and methods, discussion, and limitations sections were evaluated for determination of ordering. Results: A detailed review of 20 mixed methods studies from nursing, medicine and psychology indicates that if consideration is being given the issue of data collection sequencing, it is not being documented in published research reports. Of the studies reviewed only 2 specified reasons for data order collection. Conclusions and Implications: Although limited publication space may be a factor, researchers in general did not address potential threats to internal validity caused by data collection order. If we are to get full benefit from the potential of mixed methods studies to generate multiple views of reality, threats to validity, including order of data collection, must be carefully addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Order of Data Collection Matter?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDeshefy-Longhi, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan-Bolyai, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarpe Dixon, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsTerry Deshefy-Longhi, RN, MSN, Doctoral Student, Yale University School of Nursing, Hamden, Connecticut, USA, email: terry.deshefy-longhi@yale.edu; Susan Sullivan-Bolyai, DNSc, CNS, RN; Jane Karpe Dixon, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163513-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although the debate about the appropriate uses of a mixed methods approach continues, many researchers are, in fact, readily adopting such a combined approach. Caution must be employed, however, in considering the effect of combining these two approaches on the validity of the data collected. Specifically, a researcher must give careful thought to the order in which the qualitative and quantitative data are to be collected so that one method does not alter or bias the responses to the other method. The purpose of this paper is to explore how order of data collection is determined in mixed methods studies and to provide recommendations for researchers in determining order of data collection. Method: A review of the literature from published works from 1997 was conducted to understand current practices, investigate possible threats to internal validity due to data collection sequencing, and provide recommendations for researchers. Mixed methods studies were categorized according to sequencing of the qualitative and quantitative components, and methods, discussion, and limitations sections were evaluated for determination of ordering. Results: A detailed review of 20 mixed methods studies from nursing, medicine and psychology indicates that if consideration is being given the issue of data collection sequencing, it is not being documented in published research reports. Of the studies reviewed only 2 specified reasons for data order collection. Conclusions and Implications: Although limited publication space may be a factor, researchers in general did not address potential threats to internal validity caused by data collection order. If we are to get full benefit from the potential of mixed methods studies to generate multiple views of reality, threats to validity, including order of data collection, must be carefully addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:51Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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