2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163514
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increased Cardiovascular Disease Risk Indices in HIV-Infected Women
Author(s):
Dolan, Sara; Hadigan, Colleen; Killilea, Kathleen; Grinspoon, Steven
Author Details:
Sara Dolan, MSN, ANP, Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sdolan@partners.org; Colleen Hadigan, MD, MPH; Kathleen Killilea, BS; Steven Grinspoon, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: HIV infected patients report changes in fat distribution that may increase risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Little is known about (CVD) risk indices, including newer inflammatory markers, in the growing population of HIV-infected women. The purpose of this study is to measure (CVD) risk markers in a community sample of HIV-infected women. Methods: 100 consecutively recruited HIV-infected women and 75 healthy female control subjects were recruited from hospital and community-based health care providers. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), adiponectin, lipid and glucose levels were the main outcome measures. CT scan, Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and anthropometry were used to assess body composition. Results: Although similar in age, weight, and racial composition, HIV-infected women had more abdominal visceral fat and less extremity fat by CT and DEXA scan, and demonstrated a higher waist to hip ratio (0.92; 0.01 vs. 0.83; 0.01, p< 0.0001) than the control population. HIV-infected women demonstrated higher CRP (4.6; 0.7 vs. 2.3; 0.4 mg/L, p=0.005), IL-6 (2.7; 0.2 vs. 1.8; 0.1 pg/mL, p=0.02), triglycerides [163; 19 vs. 75; 4 mg/dL (1.84; 0.21 vs. 0.85; 0.06 mmol/L), p=0.0002], 2-hour glucose after oral glucose challenge [124; 4 vs. 103; 3 mg/dL (6.88; 0.22 vs.5.72; 0.17 mmol/L), p=0.0003], and fasting insulin [11.7; 1.1 vs. 6.5; 0.3 IU/mL (81; 8 vs. 45; 2 pmol/L), p=0.0002] and lower HDL cholesterol [45; 1 vs. 56; 2 mg/dL (1.17; 0.03 vs. 1.45; 0.05 mmol/L), p< 0.0001] and adiponectin (5.4; 0.3 vs. 7.6; 0.5 mg/L, p=0.0007) levels compared to the control population, controlling for smoking and use of hormone replacement therapy. Within the HIV group, CRP (p=0.008), adiponectin (p=0.004), fasting insulin (p=0.0006), 2-hour glucose (p=0.02) and HDL cholesterol (p=0.004) were most significantly related to waist to hip ratio in stepwise regression models controlling for smoking, age, BMI, immune function and antiretroviral drug use. Conclusions and Implications: HIV-infected women demonstrate increased risk factors for CVD. Further studies are needed to determine if increased CVD risk indices translate into increased events. Nurse-based education and treatment strategies are needed to modify CVD risk and improve abnormal fat distribution among HIV-infected women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncreased Cardiovascular Disease Risk Indices in HIV-Infected Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.authorHadigan, Colleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKillilea, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrinspoon, Stevenen_US
dc.author.detailsSara Dolan, MSN, ANP, Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: sdolan@partners.org; Colleen Hadigan, MD, MPH; Kathleen Killilea, BS; Steven Grinspoon, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163514-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: HIV infected patients report changes in fat distribution that may increase risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Little is known about (CVD) risk indices, including newer inflammatory markers, in the growing population of HIV-infected women. The purpose of this study is to measure (CVD) risk markers in a community sample of HIV-infected women. Methods: 100 consecutively recruited HIV-infected women and 75 healthy female control subjects were recruited from hospital and community-based health care providers. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), adiponectin, lipid and glucose levels were the main outcome measures. CT scan, Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and anthropometry were used to assess body composition. Results: Although similar in age, weight, and racial composition, HIV-infected women had more abdominal visceral fat and less extremity fat by CT and DEXA scan, and demonstrated a higher waist to hip ratio (0.92; 0.01 vs. 0.83; 0.01, p< 0.0001) than the control population. HIV-infected women demonstrated higher CRP (4.6; 0.7 vs. 2.3; 0.4 mg/L, p=0.005), IL-6 (2.7; 0.2 vs. 1.8; 0.1 pg/mL, p=0.02), triglycerides [163; 19 vs. 75; 4 mg/dL (1.84; 0.21 vs. 0.85; 0.06 mmol/L), p=0.0002], 2-hour glucose after oral glucose challenge [124; 4 vs. 103; 3 mg/dL (6.88; 0.22 vs.5.72; 0.17 mmol/L), p=0.0003], and fasting insulin [11.7; 1.1 vs. 6.5; 0.3 IU/mL (81; 8 vs. 45; 2 pmol/L), p=0.0002] and lower HDL cholesterol [45; 1 vs. 56; 2 mg/dL (1.17; 0.03 vs. 1.45; 0.05 mmol/L), p< 0.0001] and adiponectin (5.4; 0.3 vs. 7.6; 0.5 mg/L, p=0.0007) levels compared to the control population, controlling for smoking and use of hormone replacement therapy. Within the HIV group, CRP (p=0.008), adiponectin (p=0.004), fasting insulin (p=0.0006), 2-hour glucose (p=0.02) and HDL cholesterol (p=0.004) were most significantly related to waist to hip ratio in stepwise regression models controlling for smoking, age, BMI, immune function and antiretroviral drug use. Conclusions and Implications: HIV-infected women demonstrate increased risk factors for CVD. Further studies are needed to determine if increased CVD risk indices translate into increased events. Nurse-based education and treatment strategies are needed to modify CVD risk and improve abnormal fat distribution among HIV-infected women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:52Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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