2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163516
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Translating Best Practice in Non-Drug Pain Management
Author(s):
Dufault, Marlene; Tracy, Susanne
Author Details:
Marlene Dufault, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Rhode Island College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: Marlened@uri.edu; Susanne Tracy, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: To translate non-drug interventions for enhancing pain management into cost-effective, easy to use, best practice protocols for hospitalized older (> 60) adults undergoing joint replacement surgery (N=140) in an urban community hospital. A six-step translating-research-into-practice model was used to develop and evaluate three non-drug protocols music, guided-imagery, and massage. Specific aims were: (1) test the efficacy of protocols for decreasing pain intensity, lessening interference of pain with functional abilities, and improving satisfaction with pain management; (2) determine the usefulness and feasibility of tailored patient teaching interventions related to patients knowledge, attitudes, and ability to use the evidence-based best practice protocols, and (3) evaluate the use of non-drug interventions in a hospital stay. Methods: For efficacy outcomes, scores on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) for the study group were compared to the control group of patients prior to the institution of the Comfort Therapy Service. Outcomes are being analyzed using analysis of covariance, adjusting for baseline levels of each variable. Groups are being compared at each of three points along the trajectory off care: (a) at baseline admission on the day of surgery, (b) on the evening of postoperative day 3, and (c) on discharge day from the rehabilitation unit. For feasibility outcomes, univariate descriptive statistics are being used for each of the survey areas of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Responses to the Non-drug Use Instrument are being analyzed using descriptive univariate statistics. Results: Preliminary findings suggest the efficacy, feasibility, and usefulness of the model in translating best practices in non-drug pain management. Conclusions/Implications: The use of this model to change clinician practice and sustain organizational change had been applied to pain management in four other studies in which the evidence-bas is strong, but underused in practice. It has never been used to address the under-use of non-drug enhancements in the day-to-day care of older adults with postoperative pain. Developing and testing of patient teaching materials specifically tailored to patient's information coping style to support using these methods is an essential aspect of enhancing pharmacological therapy to improve clinical outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranslating Best Practice in Non-Drug Pain Managementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDufault, Marleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorTracy, Susanneen_US
dc.author.detailsMarlene Dufault, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Rhode Island College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: Marlened@uri.edu; Susanne Tracy, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163516-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To translate non-drug interventions for enhancing pain management into cost-effective, easy to use, best practice protocols for hospitalized older (> 60) adults undergoing joint replacement surgery (N=140) in an urban community hospital. A six-step translating-research-into-practice model was used to develop and evaluate three non-drug protocols music, guided-imagery, and massage. Specific aims were: (1) test the efficacy of protocols for decreasing pain intensity, lessening interference of pain with functional abilities, and improving satisfaction with pain management; (2) determine the usefulness and feasibility of tailored patient teaching interventions related to patients knowledge, attitudes, and ability to use the evidence-based best practice protocols, and (3) evaluate the use of non-drug interventions in a hospital stay. Methods: For efficacy outcomes, scores on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) for the study group were compared to the control group of patients prior to the institution of the Comfort Therapy Service. Outcomes are being analyzed using analysis of covariance, adjusting for baseline levels of each variable. Groups are being compared at each of three points along the trajectory off care: (a) at baseline admission on the day of surgery, (b) on the evening of postoperative day 3, and (c) on discharge day from the rehabilitation unit. For feasibility outcomes, univariate descriptive statistics are being used for each of the survey areas of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Responses to the Non-drug Use Instrument are being analyzed using descriptive univariate statistics. Results: Preliminary findings suggest the efficacy, feasibility, and usefulness of the model in translating best practices in non-drug pain management. Conclusions/Implications: The use of this model to change clinician practice and sustain organizational change had been applied to pain management in four other studies in which the evidence-bas is strong, but underused in practice. It has never been used to address the under-use of non-drug enhancements in the day-to-day care of older adults with postoperative pain. Developing and testing of patient teaching materials specifically tailored to patient's information coping style to support using these methods is an essential aspect of enhancing pharmacological therapy to improve clinical outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:08:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:08:55Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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